October 2015 Archives

The administration is planning to create a $20 million pilot program that would allow high schoolers to use Pell grants to pay for college courses.


It's hard to imagine that Washington State—which is back under NCLB and not loving it—isn't feeling a little sore these days.


Any educational resources created with federal grants would have to be openly licensed under a proposed regulation.


Some of the biggest achievement gaps are found in schools that are performing well otherwise, a CAP analysis finds.


The only education issue that merited a question from the CNBC moderators was about student loan debt, but online learning and career and technical learning also got brief mentions.


In theory at least, the deal could create more time for GOP Rep. Paul Ryan, the presumptive next House speaker, to focus on other legislation, including ESEA reauthorization.


Do higher graduation rates mean that the Obama administration's K-12 policies when it comes to school turnarounds and accountability are on the right track, as U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has claimed?


"Everybody has had a hand in what our current testing system looks like—this situation was not created by just one entity," said Michael Casserly, the executive director of the Council of the Great City Schools.


Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan is poised to become the next Speaker of the House of Representatives. What does his record indicate what he could do regarding education policy?


The U.S. Department of Education has released some general principles for states and districts to help them figure out how to cut back on assessments and ensure that they're used to drive instruction.


As president, Spellings will oversee 17 campuses in the system that serves more than 220,000 students. She currently works as the head of the George W. Bush Presidential CenteR.


The Obama administration and some civil rights groups didn't get behind an attempt to renew the NCLB law back in 2011. But that bill was stronger, from their perspective, than anything on the table in Congress right now.


The states are: Alaska, Alabama, Arizona, California, Georgia, Kansas, Maryland, Michigan, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, North Dakota, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia.


The newest round of math and reading scores on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, known as the "nation's report card," are due out early next week, and some are saying they're likely to have fallen.


The D.C. voucher program is a favorite of House Speaker John A. Boehner, and he's intent on making sure his name stays with the program even after he leaves Congress.


The DoDEA organization, which runs 172 schools serving 74,000 students of both active-duty military personnel and Department of Defense civilians, awarded a one-year, renewable contract to Parcc Inc.


The biggest federal program for high schools has a lot of fans on both sides of the congressional aisle and in school districts.


The pending departure of Rep. John Boehner, R-Ohio, the speaker of the House seems to have lit a fire under negotiations on reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


Will the newly reauthorized ESEA include money for elementary and secondary school counselors, afterschool programs, and early-childhood education?


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has a piece of good news to announce on his way out the door: High school graduation rates appear to be on track to rise for the third year in a row.


Some Republican White House contenders want to get rid of the department entirely, while others just want to slim it down.


Kasich wants to "shrink the federal education bureaucracy" by consolidating over 100 programs into "four block grants" for states.


Earlier this month, the National Education Association voted to endorse Hillary Clinton in the Democratic primary for president. But what went into that decision beforehand?


Both pieces of ESEA reauthorization legislation pending in the House and Senate would put states and districts, as opposed to the feds, in the driver's seat when it comes to turnarounds.


Three urban school districts, plus a network of charter schools, will split nearly $2 million in one-time grants aimed at helping students develop the kind of "mindsets" and skills that will help them learn.


If you were hoping for a meaty discussion of the big issues facing K-12, including testing, teacher evaluation, fixing low-performing schools, you were out of luck.


Will anyone talk about K-12 education? Will standardized testing come up? Those and other K-12 questions surround today's Democratic presidential debate between five candidates.


The Senate's ESEA rewrite includes resources for early childhood education, innovation, and literacy, but its spending bills would nix those programs.


Congressional aides are said to be burning the midnight oil in a push to get a conference report done quickly, but still produce a well-crafted bill.


The U.S. Department of Education's undersecretary covered a range of topics in a one-on-one interview at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's recent learning forum.


The toughest issue in the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act? Finding the sweet spot on accountability.


At the end of the Obama administration's second term, the Education Department is running low on both carrots and sticks.


First created in 2004, the D.C. voucher program has been the proverbial political football in Congress for years.


Experts and advocates are divided on whether Duncan's move will have a good, bad, or neutral effect on prospects of overhauling the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


The endorsement comes despite serious misgivings from some affiliates, who were hoping a slower endorsement process would give the union more time to extract more policy promises from Clinton.


A former New York state commissioner of education, he will take the reins at the U.S. Department of Education following Secretary Arne Duncan's departure in December.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, who has pushed through a dramatic reshaping of the nation's education system, first through Race to the Top and then through a series of waivers from the No Child Left Behind Act, will step down in December.


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