November 2015 Archives

The National Governors Association gave the legislation its "full endorsement," the first time the group has given a federal bill that kind of backing since 1996.


The ESSA is in many ways a U-turn from the current, much-maligned version of the ESEA law, the No Child Left Behind Act.


Click here for late stage draft of the actual bill that could become the latest iteration of the ESEA, the Every Student Succeeds Act or ESSA.


Last time, a conservative blogger was unhappy with the policy. This time, she's miffed about the process.


In the past, big-name researchers of traits like grit, persistence, and growth mindsets have all said such factors should not be measured for accountability purposes.


There's a test-participation requirement in the draft to reauthorize federal education law, but that doesn't tell the full story.


The compromise agreed to by a congressional conference committee is, in many key ways, a U-turn from the much-maligned No Child Left Behind Act.


In a conversation with state education chiefs, John King who will take over as acting U.S. Secretary of Education, said it's important they continue to push to close achievement gaps, improve teachers and raise learning standards.


The issue promises a bumpy road ahead, too, if the deal that sailed through a conference committee becomes law.


Check what appears to be at least a late-stage draft of the Every Student Succeeds Act, the name of the ESEA agreement set to replace the No Child Left Behind Act.


The state's original NCLB waiver was approved in 2012 for a two-year period, and the just-approved waiver extension is for one year.


The compromise gives states acres of new running room on accountability, while holding firm on NCLB's requirement for annual testing and data on at-risk students.


School districts and state officials have begged Congress to update the much-maligned No Child Left Behind Act, and it looks like they're on the verge of getting their wish.


The plans touch on issues ranging from teacher preparation to student-loan forgiveness, but questions remain on state implementation and U.S. Department of Education oversight.


After eight years and at least three serious attempts, Congress is finally moving forward on bipartisan, bicameral legislation to rewrite the almost-universally-despised No Child Left Behind Act.


In addition to the scores from the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC), Smarter Balanced, and other common-core tests from the past school year, the interactive presentation includes scores from previous state tests.


The roundtable also offered an opportunity for Clinton to raise issues where she might depart from President Barack Obama's policies, as well as such issues that didn't come up (at least directly) in her discussion with teachers


In keeping with the previous Republican and Democratic debates, there weren't any direct questions on K-12.


Congressional negotiators announced they have a way forward to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, with a conference committee to start working on a compromise soon.


Christmas seems to have come early this year for education advocates. After weeks of long and hard negotiations, House and Senate lawmakers have reached preliminary agreement on a bill to reauthorize the very long-stalled No Child Left Behind Act, multiple sources say.


The latest Education Department report on the federal School Improvement Grant program paints an uneven picture of SIG's impact, just as Congress is about to decide its fate.


The Education Department says all states in the competitive-grant program made progress toward their goals, but makes little mention of areas where they stumbled or backtracked.


Lawmakers in both parties—but especially Republicans—are really unhappy with the way Duncan and Company used Race to the Top, and especially, waivers from many of the mandates of the No Child Left Behind Act.


If you tuned into the Tuesday night GOP presidential debate hoping for education policy talk, once again, you got very meager scraps.


Good news for Louisiana: The state can keep its waiver from many of the mandates of the No Child Left Behind Act for another school year. But what's the bad news?


"Governors understand that early childhood education is a key component of building a literate, knowledgeable and skilled 21st century workforce," Govs. Jay Inslee and Robert Bentley wrote to the four congressional representatives.


"Progress Is No Accident: Why ESEA Can't Backtrack on High School Graduation Rates" also reports that the number of high school "dropout factories" has also declined significantly in recent years.


Title I aid, the largest single federal grant program for public schools, is at the center of many of them, but it's not the only horse on the race track.


Over the weekend Hillary Clinton, a longtime charter fan, had some tough words for charters, specifically when it comes to equity. And that sent the internet into a bit of a tail spin.


The goals here include getting more in-depth and current information on what students know and can do than the schools would with traditional summative exams, and helping students tackle material in more meaningful ways.


The state is reluctant to mandate that all its districts adopt teacher evaluations that take student progress into account.


Juneau has emphasized graduation and teacher evaluation during her tenure, during which she's also said no to a waiver from NCLB but yes to a speaking spot at the 2012 Democratic National Convention.


The answer may well be yes, if you consider a report by the National Council of Teacher Quality, an advocacy organization that likes the idea of more rigorous evaluations.


Even though both the House and Senate ESEA bills keep annual tests, they go very different ways on a lot of other assessment issues.


States will continue crafting and implementing accountability systems that build on nine basic principles outlined by state education leaders way back in 2011, chiefs say.


Teachers, school administrators, principals and state officials have launched a digital ad campaign asking lawmakers to finish work to reauthorize the ESEA.


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