December 2015 Archives

Duncan's voice broke with emotion as he talked about the 16,000 children killed by gun violence across the country during his first six years as secretary of education.


What if ESSA hadn't crossed the finish line and the next president still had to deal with waivers in 2017? How would some of the White House hopefuls have handled them?


"President-Elect Ted Cruz Appoints Arne Duncan as Education Secretary" and other stories you likely won't be reading next year.


We've been pretty occupied with news and analysis of the Every Student Succeeds Act at the end of this year—and our readers have been pretty busy reading about it.


If you've been starved for any sustained discussion about public schools from any of the presidential candidates, Hillary Clinton provided some Christmas cheer earlier this week.


If you've been wondering how many states had significant issues with test participation last spring, there's now an answer from the U.S. Department of Education.


The U.S. Department of Education sent a letter to states, warning that they need to be prepared to handle their testing opt-outs in 2015-16.


The department said the state must show that it is administering the same test statewide to students in grades 3-8 and high school by May 31, 2016, or else potentially lose a portion of the state's Title I funds.


The last eight states to get their plans approved are Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Iowa, Louisiana, Oregon, South Dakota, and Texas, along with Puerto Rico.


The Every Student Succeeds Act contains changes to non-competitive Education Department formula grants, but the fiscal 2016 federal budget impacts when those changes will begin.


The Center for American Progress highlights the program's successes, but will future Education Department leaders embrace Race to the Top's competitive-grant model?


The U.S. Department of Education wasted no time in giving states initial guidance on transition from the No Child Left Behind Act to the Every Student Succeeds Act.


There's disagreement in the education policy world about whether (and to what extent) the Education Department should flex its muscles in crafting regulations for the Every Student Succeeds Act.


Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., chairman of the Senate education committee, says at least three major oversight hearings already are being planned on the Every Student Succeeds Act.


A portion of the Every Student Succeeds Act requires the department to reduce the number of full-time equivalent employees working on programs or projects within the next year.


The civil rights community and district advocates have pretty different ideas about what the prohibitions on secretarial authority mean in the Every Student Succeeds Act.


Title I funding would receive an increase after several years of flat funding, while charter schools, the National Assessment of Educational Programs, and Head Start would also see more money in the fiscal 2016 federal budget.


Data for the class of 2014 also showed that graduation gaps between white students and their black and Hispanic peers continued to close, even as each group's rate rose.


ESSA's regulatory process may be particularly tricky, since the law seeks to strike a delicate balance between handing power over to states and reining in the feds, while on the other hand ensuring there are some "guardrails" in place to help struggling schools and traditionally overlooked groups of students.


One of the lesser-noticed changes in the Every Student Succeeds Act concerns the $2.3 billion state teacher-quality grants program, also known as Title II.


So what do state superintendents plan to do with the new power they'll have under the Every Student Succeeds Act? And how much do they see accountability changing?


The Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA, puts states and districts back at the wheel on teacher evaluation, standards, school turnarounds, and accountability.


You know you're looking at a bipartisan, compromise bill when everyone rushes the field after the final touchdown, claims partial credit, and proceeds to explain what it means.


Wednesday's big bipartisan vote marks final passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA, and sends it to President Barack Obama, who is expected to sign it Thursday.


The Every Student Succeeds Act would include key Obama administration priorities, such as pre-K, but not others, such as dramatic school turnarounds and teacher evaluation through student outcomes.


With Congress poised to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, eyes are now turning to how congressional budget negotiations will impact K-12 aid.


The Every Student Succeeds Act would be a big departure from the waivers when it comes to subgroup accountability, teacher evaluations, opportunity to learn indicators, and standards.


For years, congressional lawmakers have sought a posthumous pardon for Johnson, who was the target of racially motivated backlash early in the 20th century.


The House on Wednesday voted 359 to 64 to approve the Every Student Succeeds Act, which would scale back the federal role in education for the first time since the early 1980s.


Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., said Republicans obstructed past efforts to rewrite the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Actually, it's a lot more complicated than that.


Thirty-six disability, civil rights, education, and other organizations—including the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights—offered a measured endorsement of the Every Student Succeeds Act.


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