January 2016 Archives

Today, the White House announced what it's calling an "ambitious, all-hands-on deck" initiative to get every student in the United States coding.


The Democratic presidential contender has worked to expand access to early-childhood education, boost academic standards, and improve child health—but her track record is mixed


States will get the chance to de-emphasize tests—in favor of other factors, like school climate—when they develop new accountability plans for the Every Student Succeeds Act. The Center for American Progress is out with a report on how to help K-12 systems use tests effectively.


Cole's background as a legal eagle could prove useful as the department begins to regulate on the Every Student Succeeds Act, with its new restrictions on the education secretary. Meanwhile, Lehrich has been a senior communications aide.


States without waivers won't have to set aside funding for tutoring and school choice, like they did under NCLB, as long as they support low-performing schools.


As a White House hopeful, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz epitomizes several Republican positions regarding education, particularly when it comes to the federal government's role in public schools.


Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, a Democratic presidential hopeful, has made big promises on college access, and been skeptical of standardized testing and Obama administration competitive grants.


John B. King Jr. says such programs need to think about the needs of students with disabilities, English-learners, working parents, and others in implementing a new workforce development law.


GOP presidential hopeful Sen. Marco Rubio has a longer record on college access than on K-12 policy, and wants to scrap the U.S. Department of Education and the common core.


The NEA gave high marks to ESSA's architects, and flunked both Republican presidential contenders in Congress, Ted Cruz of Texas and Marco Rubio of Florida.


The online comment period for how the U.S. Department of Education should regulate under the Every Student Succeeds Act closed Thursday; here are some highlights.


ESSA gives states, districts, and educators a chance for a "much-needed do-over" on teacher evaluation through student outcomes, says acting U.S. Secretary of Education John King.


"Common Core is out! Second Amendment is in!" Trump also told the crowd at a rally in Tulsa, Okla., on Wednesday.


The acting U.S. education secretary says the Every Student Succeeds Act gives states and districts more flexibility to push toward equity, though there are potential soft spots.


The short answer is that the standards language in ESSA—the latest iteration of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act—strikes a delicate compromise that's kind of complicated to wrap your mind around.


The two proposals are designed to ensure that the federal higher education loan program helps more students obtain college degrees faster.


The plan includes ideas that past Republican presidential contenders and members of Congress have pitched, and even dovetails in some respects with President Barack Obama's K-12 playbook.


The new acting U.S. Secretary of Education uses his first first major speech to call for continued attention to educational equity.


The two agencies looked at policies and programs that seem to be getting results in some school districts, and put out guidance to help districts and health care agencies collaborate.


Does the exchange in the debate mean the Common Core State Standards are back in the mix as a campaign issue? Maybe.


In our new story about the opt-out movement, there's one issue that we didn't explore: advocates' feelings on the race for the White House this year.


California, which has been something of a thorn in the Education Department's side in recent years, has some ideas for the shape of ESSA regulations.


President Barack Obama also made clear in his State of the Union address that he will fight to expand access to STEM courses, and the training and recruiting of good teachers.


Sen. Lamar Alexander, head of the Senate education committee, pledged to move fast if President Barack Obama nominates an education secretary, rather than continuing to have an acting secretary.


In past addresses, President Barack Obama has asked for more money for early-childhood education, ESEA reauthorization, and new provisions on college access.


The U.S. Department of Education is seeking input from a broad range of advocates, educators, associations, and the general public on regulating under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


The Every Student Succeeds Act seeks to strike a balance between continuing protections for historically overlooked groups of students and reining in the federal government. What does that mean in practice?


Attention John King and Company: The American Federation of Teachers is not happy with the way that you are handling opt-outs in this new, post No Child Left Behind era.


"You know what a gun-free zone is for a sicko? That's bait," the Republican presidential candidate told the crowd at a campaign stop in Vermont on Thursday.


The theme of Education Week's annual Quality Counts report is "accountability"—just in time for the arrival of the Every Student Succeeds Act.


You just can't get enough information and analysis on the Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA. So just for you, we have created a very special section of Education Week explaining the ins-and-outs of the newest version of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


At a school visit in Maryland, the new acting head of the Education Department outlined his priorities for the year: college-completion, K-12 equity, and the teaching profession.


The front-runner for the Democratic nomination wants to restrict the use of seclusion and restraints for children with autism and other students in special education.


Students of color and students who are Syrian, Muslim, Middle Eastern, Arab, Sikh, or Jewish may feel unsafe at school in light of sensitive discussions about international events, officials in the U.S. Department of Education said.


If you thought the recent lull in K-12 talk on the presidential campaign trail meant candidates had forgotten how to throw shade when it comes to the Common Core State Standards, think again.


The new acting secretary is expecting another record high graduation rate and high-speed Internet access for more students.


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