February 2016 Archives

The education department billed the grant program's expansion as the federal government's latest move in a broad effort to boost the college and career prospects for American Indian and Alaskan Native youth.


When the general public visits the U.S. Department of Education's presence on the Internet, what are they checking out the most?


The U.S. Department of Education has already released guidance on parts of how that transition will work, but Friday, the agency came out with an omnibus "here's what we have decided" frequently asked questions document.


The Senate education committee's hearing on acting Secretary of Education John B. King Jr.'s nomination featured few partisan fireworks and plenty of questions about ESSA regulation.


States and districts have more flexibility under the Every Student Succeeds Act, but also civil rights responsibilities, acting Education Secretary John B. King Jr. told House lawmakers Thursday.


Acting U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. highlighted efforts to improve school diversity and elevate the teaching profession in the Education Department's fiscal 2016 budget request.


President Barack Obama's pick to head the U.S. Department of Education will likely be asked about ESSA implementation and the common core during his confirmation hearing Thursday.


Tuesday's congressional hearing was second so far on oversight of the new federal education law, the Every Student Succeeds Act.


"It's not about identifying bad actors. It's an opportunity to check practices and supports," Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Michael Yudin said Monday.


We've checked the seven remaining major presidential candidates' websites and Facebook posts to see what they've been saying about education over the past six months.


The head of the senate education committee told governors at their annual convention Sunday that the reauthorized education act gives them wide latitude in shaping education policy.


Public school policy has not received a lot of attention in the 2016 race, even with Bush in the race.


The two new initiatives are part of the "Every Student, Every Day" campaign begun under President Barack Obama last year to bolster attendance.


The Every Student Succeeds Act won't be fully in place until the 2017-18 school year, when a new president and most likely, education secretary will be in charge.


The authors of the Every Student Succeeds Act tried to pare down the number of Education Department staff, but President Barack Obama apparently has other ideas.


The pediatric neurosurgeon and GOP presidential candidate has a plan touching on school choice and local control, but has also made waves his comments on school funding and other matters.


Clinton wants to encourage schools to create "School Climate Support Teams" in districts where a lot of kids are suspended or arrested in school.


Less than half of the officials who have led the department since its inception in 1980 were full-time K-12 classroom teachers at one point in their careers.


Previous iterations of the $1 billion grant program haven't been well received by Congress, though.


Acting U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. may not be "acting" in his role much longer. President Barack Obama officially nominated King for the post.


In general, the leading candidates attended public school themselves, with a couple of notable exceptions. And in general, the candidates tended to send their own children to private or religious schools.


House education committee members make clear they'll be keeping a close eye on states and the Education Department as they implement the Every Student Succeeds Act.


The budget puts a premium on integration but provides essentially level funding for Title I grants for disadvantaged kids and special education state grants.


The Obama administration is expected to seek $120 million in new money to help schools become more integrated, among other proposals in the fiscal 2017 budget.


President Barack Obama's upcoming budget is the first since the passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act and could hold clues to its implementation.


States without waivers from the No Child Left Behind Act can come up with an alternative plan to support students in schools that have missed achievement targets.


Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, running for the GOP presidential nomination, has helped set the national K-12 agenda—and generated plenty of controversy in the process.


In its budget request coming out next week, the Obama administration wants new money to bolster job opportunities for young people, including high school students.


The department wants nominations for a "negotiated rulemaking" committee, according to a notice slated to be published in the Federal Register Thursday.


Ohio Gov. John Kasich, a GOP presidential hopeful, is a budget hawk who actually boosted education funding and still supports the Common Core State Standards.


Teachers' union leaders who put muscle and money behind Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton say they're not disheartened with her photo finish in the Iowa caucuses.


Danny Harris, the Education Department's chief information officer, has been counseled by the department about his actions, but isn't expected to receive further punishment.


The guidance includes ideas like ensuring tests are of high-quality and worth taking, and makes clear states and districts can use federal funds to support some of that work.


From the common core to gun-free school zones, developer and GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump has made his views pretty clear about a few hot-button K-12 issues.


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