March 2016 Archives

The U.S. Department of Education announced Thursday it soon will release draft rules and other materials related to testing and federal school finance under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


The commission could help to give broader and more permanent approval to the White House's push to use more tiered-evidence systems—like those used in the Every Student Succeeds Act and the Investing in Innovation program—to evaluate federal programs.


Why is comparability on people's minds? It's because of negotiated rulemaking for supplement-not-supplant, a federal requirement that Title I money must provide additional services, and not simply supplant state and local funding.


Appointed as the nation's first secretary of education in 1979 by President Jimmy Carter, she previously had been a federal appeals court judge and a California appeals court judge.


The Vermont senator has attracted a fair share of educators to his side, even though it's higher education, not K-12, that's featured prominently in his campaign.


Asked at a town hall event what he thinks are the top three functions of the federal government, GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump cited national security, education, and health care.


The lab is part of the U.S. Department of Education's effort to close "existing equity gaps" when it comes to teacher distribution.


The suit, by Lambda Legal, the American Civil Liberties Union, ACLU of North Carolina, and Equality North Carolina, claims that the law violates the equal protection clause of the 14th amendment to the U.S. Constitution and Title IX.


A new report explores how explores how states and the U.S. Department of Education can support new, local, and more effective approaches to Title I spending.


In many respects, officials in statehouses and state education departments are still figuring out how they'll proceed under ESSA.


Plenty of issues have gotten more ink and pixels in coverage of the Every Student Succeeds Act than parent, family, and other forms of engagement—but advocates for those issues are excited about what the law does.


Negotiated rulemaking was successful, but contentious, when negotiators wrote regulations for the No Child Left Behind Act in 2002.


As schools in Forsyth, Ga., and Corona-Norco, Calif., discovered, educators can learn a lot even from programs that don't become superstars under Investing in Innovation.


A new report pinpoints what it says are successful efforts by colleges and universities on both fronts, but federal officials also stress that there's still work to be done.


While the discussion remained civil, collegial, and wonky on the third day of the negotiations, it's clear there was a lot of passion for this population.


Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton wants to resurrect a program from the 1990s that provided federal funds to refurbish and repair crumbling schools.


Of the three stimulus-era marquee education-grant programs, Investing in Innovation is the only one enshrined in the Every Student Succeeds Act, though under a different name.


The House education committee weighs the issue at a time when some lawmakers are pushing to update the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, or FERPA.


Negotiators were divided, at least rhetorically, about how far they should go in advancing equity vs. ensuring flexibility for local leaders under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


Before and even after the new U.S. Secretary of Education was confirmed last week, many people assumed that he would be sticking around just for the next 10 months or so.


A team of negotiators kicked off regulations on "supplement-not-supplant" rules, and testing. But it's unclear from the conversation where the regulations will end up.


The Every Student Succeeds Act means many states will be rethinking their accountability policies and potentially broadening the definition of what counts as a successful school.


States are already rolling up their sleeves and moving forward on new accountability systems, even as the U.S. Department of Education begins crafting regulations for the new law.


Over 75 national and regional organizations are asking Congress to beef up funding for the Student Support and Academic Enrichment Grants, which get about $500 million in President Barack Obama's proposed budget.


Duncan's official title will be managing partner for the Palo Alto, Calif.,-based philanthropy and advocacy organization, which is led up by Laurene Powell Jobs, the widow of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs.


The state requested a waiver from the federal requirement in January. Failure to meet the 95-percent requirement can lead to funding penalties for states.


Groups including AASA, The School Administrators Association, the American Federation of Teachers, and the National Rural Education Association seek Title I funding at $450 million above the president's budget.


Negotiators will talk about interim assessments, computer-adaptive tests, and how to handle special populations. But some of the most interesting topics aren't part of the process.


The list already has its share of critics, both among advocates for educational practitioners and those who represent parents or particular groups of students.


"I do not want Mayor Emanuel's endorsement if I win the Democratic nomination," Sen. Bernie Sanders, who is seeking the Democratic nomination for president, said last week.


King had been serving as acting secretary since the start of this year after taking over for former Secretary Arne Duncan. The vote in the Senate was 49-40.


Acting U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King, Jr. is urging district leaders to start preparing for how to gauge school performance under ESSA.


In response to a question about the common core, GOP presidential candidates opened up about their education agendas during a debate Thursday night.


Sen. Alexander pointed out that the block grant was essentially a compromise;many senators wanted to keep those eliminated programs around, or had hoped to create new ones. He doesn't understand then why the president's budget asks for money for new K-12 programs, while not seeking to fund the block grant sufficiently.


The move is a potential violation of the Every Student Succeeds Act, which requires that students in grades 3-8 are given one test statewide


What did Alexander say about education back in 1996 and 2000, when he sought the GOP nomination for president, and how does what he said on the campaign trail compare to today?


Acting U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. is one step closer to being a full-fledged cabinet official with Wednesday's 16-6 vote by the Senate education committee.


John B. King Jr., the Education Department's top official, urges federal lawmakers to reauthorize the big career-tech-ed law, but few are optimistic that Congress will get it done any time soon.


Regulations for the "supplement-not-supplant" requirement will be up for discussion when Every Student Success Act Title I negotiators meet.


Many Republicans, and some Democrats too, might balk at the idea of a Washington-backed group rappelling into a school district amid pledges to help fix problems.


Acting Education Secretary John B. King Jr., told a conference of mayors and local officials that he plans to spend part of his time spotlighting school-improvement strategies.


Though he's yet to lay out a detailed K-12 platform, we know the GOP presidential candidate doesn't like the common core and thinks American students produce lousy test scores.


Clinton said she'd like to create an "education SWAT team" at the U.S. Department of Education to help intervene in Detroit's struggling schools, as well as steer federal money to repairing and modernizing schools.


Later this month, negotiators will gather at the U.S. Department of Education to hash out regulations for certain parts of the Every Student Succeeds Act.


This may be the organizations' way of providing a kind of counterweight to another letter, from governors, state boards of education, teachers' unions and more calling for flexibility to be at the center of ESSA regulation.


Ohio Gov. John Kasich said he'd like to slim down the U.S. Department of Education, but didn't say whether he would bail out Detroit public schools.


A group of progressives, including leaders in the opt-out movement, sent a letter to the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee this week recommending that its members not confirm King, whose nomination is slated for a vote next week.


Ever since the Every Student Succeeds Act was signed into law last December, policy wonks and others have wondered exactly how states would react to the new law


With a new administration, especially if it's of a different party, implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act could hit a few speed bumps or worse, one analyst says.


We've got a list of folks who have worked for the candidates in the past, or are working for them now, on education issues.


Districts in more than 30 states could lose some Title I funding if Congress adopts the president's fiscal 2017 budget proposal, says an unpublished Congressional Research Service analysis.


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