April 2016 Archives

The No Child Left Behind Act was a huge mistake, standardized testing isn't worth believing in, and teachers should be more respected and better paid than they are, according to Jane Sanders, a social worker and academic and the wife of Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Earlier this month, the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee approved the bill, which is sponsored by Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah

The backdrop for this is the tetchy debate over "supplement-not-supplant." That part of ESSA requires federal money not to be used to fill gaps left by state and local funding systems.

The law's lead authors in the House—Reps. John Kline, R-Minn., the chairman of the House education committee, and Bobby Scott, the top Democrat—sent a letter to lawmakers who oversee K-12 spending asking for full funding—$1.6 billion or more—for a new flexible spending program.

So what has Fiorina said and done with respect to K-12? Not a whole lot, but during her 2016 campaign, we did get a few details from her about what she envisioned for education policy.

For the most part, Congress has been pretty quiet on K-12 in the months since it passed ESSA. But there are congressional elections this year, and some of them could have a notable impact on the two committees that deal with education policy.

"Where we are as a country isn't a truthful reflection of who we are ... We are better than folks struggling through the family separation, reunification, re-entry process without support," Secretary John B. King Jr. said during a Monday event.

You may have read over and over that the Every Student Succeeds Act shifts more power over education policy to states. But what you may be less familiar with is the overall political landscape in the states.

There's a little noticed provision in the Every Student Succeeds Act that could help states and districts use federal funding to expand or try out academic services for individual kids.

Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas hasn't said a lot about public schools on the GOP presidential campaign trail, but his handful of policy positions are pretty clear. And one of them is an old favorite for many conservatives.

The last round of the Obama administration's Investing in Innovation grant program as we know it starts now, with applications available later this month.

Duncan's analysis and opinion pieces will appear on the Brown Center Chalkboard, the Institution's policy blog.

School districts, state chiefs, advocates, and the U.S. Department of Education now have a better idea of how testing will work under the Every Student Succeeds Act.

What happened in voting booths in areas of the Empire State where the testing opt-out movement was a big deal in the 2014-15 school year?

A panel of educators, advocates, and Education Department officials reached agreement on assessment regulations under the Every Student Succeeds Act, but deadlocked on a key spending issue.

The bill from House Reps. Richard Hanna, R-N.Y., and Mark Takano, D-Calif., would allow teachers to apply their classroom service time to two federal loan-forgiveness programs simultaneously.

In a conversation with Andrew Rotherham of Bellwether Education Partners, Duncan stressed that school funding gaps between wealthy and non-wealthy schools persist despite federal law, and are quite stark.

It's now or never for a panel of educators, advocates, and experts trying to hammer out rules for the Every Student Succeeds Act.

Just in case negotiators hashing out rules for the Every Student Succeeds Act aren't able to come to kumbaya, here's a breakdown of how negotiated rulemaking and what happens if/when it does.

The Republican presidential candidate hasn't revealed many details about his plans for K-12, but his foundation has donated to several educational and child-centered organizations.

It's unclear if the U.S. Department of Education's latest proposals, issued Friday, will defuse a contentious debate over Every Student Succeeds Act regulations.

States seeking to develop new types of tests or look at the number and type of tests they offer can apply for $9 million in federal competitive grants.

More often than not, teachers at the SIG schools that got extra support from their districts reported that these outside efforts weren't particularly helpful.

H.R. 4901, the Scholarships for Opportunity and Results Reauthorization Act from Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, would reauthorize the D.C. voucher program for three years.

If schools want to prepare students for the jobs of the future, King plans to say, they'll need to move beyond just reading and math.

U.S. Secretary of Education John King isn't backing down on the department's stance on how a wonky spending provision should play out under ESSA.

In a testy Senate education committee hearing Tuesday, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., told Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. that he believed the U.S. Department of Education was not following the Every Student Succeeds Act.

Should so-called education reform advocates be interested in or perhaps even enthusiastic about the Ohio Gov. John Kasich's presidential campaign?

The new law includes a host of new transparency requirements that will give the feds, states, districts, educators, advocates and (yes) education reporters a much clearer picture of how different populations of kids are doing.

Members of the Every Student Succeeds Act negotiated rulemaking committee couldn't agree on how to ensure that federal Title I aid for low-income students does not supplant state and local money.

"Researchers are just like everyone else; we can be political too," said Pedro Noguera, a New York University education professor, during the start of the American Educational Research Association Research's centennial meeting on Friday.

Obama announced that he plans to nominate Matthew Lehrich, Amy McIntosh, and Ann Whalen to be assistant secretaries helping to run various areas of the Education Department.

Students at the Bronx Lighthouse Charter Preparatory Academy got wind of Cruz's plan, and sent a letter to the principal saying that they would walk out of Cruz's slated appearance at the school on Wednesday.

The U.S. Department of Education proposed a definition of severe cognitive disabilities under the Every Student Succeeds Act, but negotiators haven't accepted it yet.

Two members of the negotiated rulemaking committee who sometimes find themselves on opposite sides want the panel to reach agreement on Every Student Succeeds Act rules.

Despite collegial discussion, the committee hasn't reached agreement on a host of testing issues or started on what's arguably the thorniest proposal involving "supplement-not-supplant."

Yudin has been with the Education Department since 2010 in a variety of capacities. He became acting secretary of the office of special education and rehabilitative services, or OSERS, in August 2012, and was officially confirmed in that position in June 2015.

The Every Student Succeeds Act is over 1,000 pages long. And it's not exactly a thrill ride to read. Couldn't Congress have just put that thing on YouTube?

How much should state and district leaders rethink how they handle federal funds under the Every Student Succeeds Act? Quite a lot, some policy experts recommend.

"This is a tremendous opportunity for us to think differently about how we define educational excellence," he said at the annual legislative conference of the Council of Chief State School Officers.

More than half a dozen big edu-groups warn the department not to create any new definitions for supplement-not-supplant as it regulates on ESSA.

The U.S. Department of Education Friday released draft rules being negotiated on testing and on a spending portion of the Every Student Succeeds Act called "supplement-not-supplant."

Although the reopened comment period is limited only to this specific issue, it would seem to further delay the final regulations, which were due out last December.

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