May 2016 Archives

If you're still reading up on the draft accountability rules for the Every Student Succeeds Act—don't worry, lots of folks are still reading the 192 pages and figuring out what they mean.

The much-anticipated rules deal with a number of complicated and often controversial topics related to school ratings, test participation, school turnaround requirements, and more.

Pre-K access, achievement gaps, and the Every Student Succeeds Act came up as advisers to the two Democratic presidential hopefuls debated education policy at the Newseum in Washington.

Proposed rules released Thursday by the Education Department include state accountability plans and what school report cards have to include under the Every Student Succeeds Act.

The federal agencies' assertion that Title IX's prohibition on sex discrimination also applies to gender identity is incorrect, says the complaint filed by Alabama, Arizona, and nine other states.

In a May 24 letter, the top two Democrats on K-12 issues in Congress told the federal department to make sure that ESSA has robust accountability language on a number of fronts.

On Tuesday, the Foundation for Excellence in Education announced that Bush, who dropped out of the presidential race last February after a poor showing in the early state races, is returning to the foundation as its chairman.

There's a lively debate about intradistrict funding gaps between schools with low levels of state and local aid and their wealthier counterparts. But is a major factor being overlooked?

Clinton has proposed doubling the country's investment in Early Head Start, a federal program for infant and toddler care and education.

States reported both successes and struggles in work funded by the Race to the Top competitive-grant program, a U.S. Department of Education report says.

Just 5 percent of principals reported implementing all 12 of the School Improvement Grant transformation strategies, and on average, principals reported fully implementing six out of the 12.

The U.S. Department of Education is acting like a "national school board" in attempting to tell public schools how they should address the rights of transgender students, according to 25 Republican senators.

Republicans on the committee said the Improving Child Nutrition and Education Act of 2016 is necessary to beat back what they see as an oversized federal role in school meals

The Every Student Succeeds Act will require at least a few significant shifts for the indicators states use for student achievement and school quality, the Center for American Progress says.

A spending provision of the Every Student Succeeds Act called "supplement-not-supplant" was again under the spotlight during a Senate education committee hearing on Wednesday.

Meeting with reporters, Education Secretary John B. King Jr. said his department will look to ensure that federal Title I aid to students from low-income backgrounds is truly supplemental.

The percentage of schools serving students who mostly are black and Hispanic and also from low-income backgrounds has ticked up in recent years, the Government Accountability Office finds.

The U.S. Department of Education will reserve $19 million of Pell grant money to help pay for low-income high school students to participate in dual-enrollment programs.

Requests for applications for the two larger grant tiers for Investing in Innovation, validation and scale-up, don't include diversifying schools as a priority.

Last December, the U.S. Senate unanimously passed the Strengthening Education Through Research Act. It's designed to reauthorize the structure of education research at the Institute for Education Sciences.

Democrats and some education advocates said the guidance provides important protection for transgender students, while Republicans and others call it an inappropriate federal intrusion into education.

Duncan and Chan talked about what they have learned from their past endeavors and where they see K-12 education going from here at the NewSchools Venture Fund conference.

The committee, presided over by Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., and Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., heard testimony about the condition, misperceptions attached to it, and how mandatory screening for children at a young age could dramatically improve their experiences in schools and educational outcomes.

The Congressional Research Service says the U.S. Department of Education's proposed regulations for "supplement-not-supplant" don't have a direct basis in the Every Student Succeeds Act.

The letter to Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. fits into a broader pattern of Democrats urging the Education Department to take a proactive role in ESSA implementation.

There's an outside, slim, but still interesting-to-think-about chance that Sanders could end up becoming the top Democrat on the Senate education committee, or even the panel's chairman come January.

James Guthrie, the former head of the Nevada schools, said he had a chance meeting with the presumptive Republican presidential nominee back in January, before the Iowa presidential caucuses.

The Every Student Succeeds Act makes it easier for children in foster care to stay in their original schools, but different groups have different ideas about how the costs should be covered.

Where does Donald Trump's status as presumptive GOP nominee leave the folks who have advised Republican candidates on education policy for years? Will they go to work for him if he's elected or help his campaign?

A Whiteboard Advisors survey offers a look at who education insiders think might head the Education Department under a President Hillary Clinton or a President Donald Trump.

"He's created an environment of scapegoating and demonizing. It is influencing children and it is influencing behavior in schools. It is making it much, much harder for us," AFT President Randi Weingarten said on a conference call Thursday.

How familiar does the Every Student Succeeds Act feel to superintendents and principals, and do they think it will have a positive or negative impact on districts and schools?

Presumptive GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump was featured in an Education Week story 26 years ago involving the site of a hotel where Robert F. Kennedy was assassinated in 1968.

A report from the Education Department on 2015 complaints show that language-bias cases are on the rise, and in most states, civil rights complaints related to disabilities were the most common.

Trump has baffled education policy wonks, claimed he wants to get rid of the U.S. Department of Education, and says the Common Core State Standards are a "disaster."

Dear U.S. Secretary John B. King, Jr.: Write regulations for the Every Student Succeeds Act that poor kids get the federal funds they were intended to get and don't back down from the fight over supplement-not-supplant, nine Democratic senators, including Sen. Bernie Sanders, say.

The White House has issued a report that outlines what it sees as its greatest hits in K-12, including new energy around early childhood education and STEM teachers.

"There's a new sense of urgency in the country of talking about race and class," King told an audience at the Education Writers Association conference on Monday.

The number one thing that advocates, education wonks, and reporters are watching this spring: How will the U.S. Department of Education decide to regulate on accountability for the Every Student Succeeds Act?

North Carolina New Schools was the first i3 grantee to go from the "validation" level—for programs with some evidence to back them up—to the Scale Up, for proven approaches ready to go big.

There's a lot of disagreement about what possible ESSA spending regulations could cost. But there have been a couple of attempts to put a price tag on the proposal to make spending between rich and poor schools more equal.

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