June 2016 Archives

States and districts hoping to "test drive" the next generation of assessments can try, thanks to one of the most buzzed-about pieces of the Every Student Succeeds Act.

It was the second congressional hearing about the Every Student Succeeds Act in under a week featuring U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr.

The Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act was introduced by Rep. Katherine Clark, D-Mass., and Rep. Glenn Thompson, R-Pa.

U.S. Education Secretary John B. King Jr. will urge charter school leaders Tuesday to use the same innovative approach they've applied to various issues to rethink their approaches to school discipline, and to cut back on student suspensions.

Computer science education and STEM education would get extra attention and resources under a proposal released by Hillary Clinton, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee.

A new Education Commission of the States report provides states a few pointers on how they can consider expanding learning opportunities for students beyond reading and math.

So what does a draft version of the Democratic Party's policy platform say about K-12 education?

Federal lawmakers aren't slated to do anything nearly as monumental as the Every Student Succeeds Act during the rest of this session of Congress, but lawmakers might still have a few notable bills up their sleeves.

State K-12 leaders worry that the U.S. Department of Education is bent on trying to enforce the previous version of the Every Student Succeeds Act.

Testifying on Capitol Hill, John B. King Jr. tried to quell fears from House lawmakers that the proposals go beyond what the Every Student Succeeds Act allows.

Federal officials offer some rules of the road on reaching out to the education community and ensuring that the Every Student Succeeds Act works for foster children.

While some of the proposed regulations are a positive step, they might need additional teeth, says the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and 30 other groups.

A change to the federal AP/IB program under the Every Student Succeeds Act means states and districts will need to think hard about continuing to cover low-income students' testing fees.

Under the Every Student Succeeds Act, many states will have to drop their policy of using these groups in the place of individual subgroups for federal accountability purposes.

The Every Student Succeeds Act may put states in the driver's seat when it comes to accountability, teacher quality, and more, but it also asks state leaders to do some serious "stakeholder engagement."

If you're rejecting the presumptive Democratic and Republican presidential nominees, here's a look at where candidates from some other parties stand on education.

We help you understand the ins-and-outs of the Every Student Succeeds Act, the law that replaced No Child Left Behind, through webinars, cheat sheets, and more.

Key changes under the Every Student Succeeds Act aim to help students who are transitioning out of juvenile justice back to traditional public schools, or trying to at least.

The "Dear Colleague" letter, dated Wednesday, says the persistent under-representation of girls and women in CTE programs can hinder the earning power in their careers, along with other harmful impacts.

At some point, the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is going to announce his pick for vice president. Let's take a look at where some prospects stand on education.

It's pretty easy to find wonky details about Hillary Clinton's K-12 resume. But what about some people who might join her on the Democratic ticket?

The Every Student Succeeds Act won bipartisan passage, but Education Secretary John B. King Jr. and Senate education committee Chairman Lamar Alexander have their differences on the law.

Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., talks about the development of the Every Student Succeeds Act, the regulatory process, and how education is playing out in the presidential race.

The chairman of the Senate education committee spoke with Politics K-12 about his role in getting the Every Student Succeeds Act over the congressional finish line.

The Every Student Succeed Act's Preschool Development Grants, which provided dedicated federal funding to early learning, are authorized for $250 million under the law,

The ranking member on the House education committee helped craft the Every Student Succeeds Act's compromise on accountability and talks about the negotiations that led to its passage.

Politics K-12 talked with the Washington Democrat, who helped craft the Every Student Succeeds Act, about the development of the law and her plans for oversight.

Advocates—and a number of lawmakers were disappointed in how a bipartisan K-12 spending bill handles the Support and Academic Enrichment Grants, the new flexible fund created in the Every Student Succeeds Act.

Duncan told Fast Company that he sees Pluralsight, which is reportedly worth more than $1 billion, as a way to further democratize education.

Proposed accountability regulations for the Every Student Succeeds Act have been out for about two weeks; what do those who will have to spearhead the new plans think?

U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. and others think the original 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act was a civil rights law. But not everyone does. What's the history of the law, and why does it matter?

Congress isn't expected to fund the administration's proposal for a grant program aimed at diversity, but the Obama administration is pushing the issue through other means.

The Alliance for Excellent Education is recommending states set a minimum sample size of 10 in tracking accountability for certain vulnerable groups of students.

School districts and states wouldn't see big increases to special education aid or Title I funding for disadvantaged students under a spending bill approved Tuesday.

"A Better Way: Our Vision for a Confident America" doesn't spend a ton of time dealing with K-12, but the plan from a task force of House Republicans and presented by Speaker Paul Ryan contains a few things worth noting for educators.

Check out our latest effort to give you clarity and concrete information about how the proposed ESSA accountability rules would govern school ratings, opt-out, and a whole lot more.

The twists and turns of Every Student Succeeds Act implementation dominated the conversation as the education secretary sat down with Politics K-12's Alyson Klein.

The disagreement relates to how the law tries to create more stability for foster care students by emphasizing their "school of origin."

Professor and radio show host Sam Clovis serves as Trump's national co-chair. He is not a fan of the Common Core State Standards, but he does like charter schools and civics.

Should the department ask states to come up with their own "maximum" time during which a student is expected to become proficient? And if so, what kind of research should inform states' timelines?

The proposed ESSA accountability regulations the U.S. Department of Education released last week could make schools' transition to the new law trickier than previously expected.

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