July 2016 Archives

The Democratic presidential nominee's Thursday speech on the night she accepted her party's nod capped a four-day convention during which many speakers praised her work for disadvantaged children.


While Democratic and Republican teachers may disagree on issues like school choice and education spending, many interviewed at the conventions want politicians to trust them to do their jobs.


A summer reading program in North Philadelphia aims to provide the benefits of literacy to young people, part of a broader campaign to improve students' reading skills.


We caught up with American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten on the third day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia as she made the rounds.


The shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary in 2012 received prominent attention on the third night of the Democratic National Convention, while pre-K and teachers also got nods from speakers.


The nearly eight years of the Obama administration haven't been a cakewalk for the National Education Association. But the union's president, Lily Eskelsen García, thinks things are looking up.


Donald Trump's children and Hillary Clinton's daughter attended expensive private schools. What if all students in U.S. public schools had the same kind of financial resources behind them?


Former President Bill Clinton capped a night of speeches at the Democratic convention making his wife's efforts the centerpiece of the party's case for sending her to the White House.


Two Nevada delegates to the Democratic National Convention, Clark County teachers Jennifer Webb-Cook and Alexis Salt, have a lot in common, except their preferred candidate.


Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont isn't famous for promoting school choice—but that doesn't daunt Wilson Holts, one of his fans in Philadelphia for the Democratic National Convention.


A new education policy group led by the former secretary wants to ensure that state Republican lawmakers stick to conservative principles as they implement the Every Student Succeeds Act.


At the Democratic National Convention, leaders in the education redesign movement hold a policy forum to ponder life after President Barack Obama leaves office.


In one email released by WikiLeaks, a communications staffer for the DNC said common core was too sensitive politically to be included in a video about GOP candidates.


The Vermont senator and former White House hopeful, who spoke Monday night at the Democratic National Convention, also highlighted his plans to make college more affordable.


The presidents of both the National Education Association and the American Federation of Teachers, which endorsed Hillary Clinton early on, gave her an enthusiastic embrace at the Democratic convention Monday.


If you were hoping the Democratic convention would give voters a sense of what testing and accountability would look like under a President Hillary Clinton, you may end up disappointed.


The Democratic Party platform also opposes laws that restrict transgender students' access to public facilities like school restrooms and locker rooms in a clear contrast with the GOP's education platform.


Being seen as too close to President Barack Obama on K-12 could hurt presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton in wooing supporters of her primary rival, Sen. Bernie Sanders.


The Virginia senator, a former governor of that state, has a record in the U.S. Senate of supporting career and technical education, along with prevention of sexual assault.


In accepting the GOP presidential nomination, Donald Trump pledges to "rescue kids from failing schools" and let parents send their children to "a safe school of their choice."


Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump hasn't talked much about K-12 education, but when he has, it's usually been colorful.


Education needs to be a bigger part of the Republican Party's message, Ben Marchi, a delegate to the Republican National Convention, told us in the Quicken Loans Arena.


"I'd like to see the parents and the school boards have more say in how they teach their kids in the localities," Jace Laquerre said on the floor of the RNC Wednesday.


A few miles from the Republican convention site, a youth club's farming program and music studio offer participants outlets for their emotions and to learn broadly applicable skills.


In his speech to Republican convention delegates Wednesday, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence vouched for GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump when it comes to expanding educational options.


Darren Ray Waddles, an aspiring teacher and Republican convention delegate, says he trusts GOP nominee Donald Trump to handle education policy better than presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.


Molly Spearman, South Carolina's superintendent, thinks the Republican presidential nominee is likely to be a big backer of local control, though Trump has said little about education so far.


A panel featuring Indiana Rep. Luke Messer wrestles with how the Republican Party can promote charters, vouchers, and other options without creating a "Department of School Choice."


The son of the Republican presidential nominee delivered a fiery denunciation of teacher tenure and praised school choice on the second night of the GOP convention.


Delegates and even some lawmakers at the Republican National Convention say they are in the dark about presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump's positions on education policy.


A scenario familiar to many classroom teachers is playing out on a much bigger scale at the Republican National Convention.


The House education committee chairman, a handful of elected state chiefs, and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush are among those who will not be at the GOP convention in Cleveland.


Members of Life Matters Journal, which opposes "aggressive violence" in forms that cross political boundaries, handed out fliers outside the Republican National Convention's


The platform states that "we encourage the parents and educators who are implementing alternatives to Common Core, and congratulate the States who have successfully repealed it."


Like the National Education Association, the AFT endorsed Clinton early, generating some criticism from some members.


The National Education Association throws a reception for Republican lawmakers who helped pass one of the union's top legislative priorities in decades, the Every Student Succeeds Act.


The head of the Senate education committee, who is attending the Republican National Convention, says he thinks that Donald Trump would champion local control of schools and fewer regulations.


We caught up with Kathryn Gardner, a guest of a convention delegate, as she waited to board a bus for the Republican National Convention in downtown Cleveland. Here are a few thoughts she had on what Donald Trump would mean for education, common core, and more.


The funding rule in question deals with the ESSA requirement that federal funding supplement, and not supplant, state and local funding.


The list of speakers includes some folks with a background on K-12 policy, like Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin, and Chris Christie of New Jersey.


Dive into the presumptive Democratic and Republican presidential nominees' statements and positions on a range of issues, from school choice to school safety, through Education Week's online guide.


Indiana's Republican Gov. Mike Pence helped expand funding for charter schools, lift a cap on school vouchers, and make Indiana the first state to ditch the common core.


Critiques from Congress and members of the education community of proposed accountability rules under the Every Student Succeeds Act continue to crop up.


The House appropriations committee's education spending bill for fiscal 2017 boosts federal spending on special education and a new block grant, but makes cuts to or eliminates several other programs.


The U.S. Department of Education Wednesday released guidance explaining how schools and districts can use their federal funding to give students a well-rounded education.


One of the 112 members of the committee said the party's opposition comes because pre-K "inserts the state in the family relationship in the very early stages of a child's life."


A breakdown of responses from African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Hispanics, and non-Hispanic whites found that African-Americans were the most likely to select education as a top issue.


Last week, we reported on key aspects of the spending bill that was approved by the House panel overseeing education funding, such as the increases for the Title IV block grant and special education.


The Democratic platform would affirm parents' right to opt children out of tests and call for an end to test-based teacher evaluations, according to those who have seen excerpts.


In 2009, following the death of Sen. Ted Kennedy, D-Mass., a longtime K-12 policy leader, Bayh was mentioned as someone who could fill the void on education issues.


If parents want their children to be prepared for a diverse workforce, they should help bolster diversity in schools, U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King, Jr., told the National PTA Friday.


When it comes to putting out a comprehensive plan on K-12 education, Hillary Clinton circa 2008 was way ahead of the 2016 version. And Donald Trump is behind other recent GOP nominees on that score.


"We need to invest more in prevention than in punishment, to invest more in schools, not prisons," states U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr.


The National Education Association and Sen. Lamar Alexander have developed a good working relationship, resulting in several legislative wins, including the Every Student Succeeds Act.


The panel's top Democrat said the bill would cut or eliminate more than a dozen programs, despite bipartisan reauthorization of the Every Student Succeeds Act.


The bipartisan measure aims to better align CTE programs with the economy, focus more on disadvantaged students, and boost transparency and accountability for these programs.


The House committee that oversees education spending released legislation Wednesday that would cut the U.S. Department of Education's overall budget by $1.3 billion overall, or nearly 2 percent.


A look at some of the nuts and bolts of the proposed reauthorization of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act, due for markup by a congressional committee on Thursday.


The Education Department floats regulations for states to craft their own testing models, and nails down how testing will work under the Every Student Succeeds Act in general.


The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee told members of the National Education Association she favors higher teacher pay, expanded wraparound services for students, and fixing up crumbling school facilities.


Based on recent congressional hearings, it's become relatively clear what lawmakers' biggest concerns are when it comes to the U.S. Department of Education's proposed ESSA accountability regulations.


The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee is speaking Tuesday before the National Education Association, a 3-million member union that's already endorsed her.


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