August 2016 Archives

The Education Department aims to give districts and states added flexibility in use of funds to aid low-income students, but not enough to mollify its sharpest critics in Washington.


The vast majority of states don't give their schools much of an incentive to bolster achievement for the most advanced students, according to a report released Wednesday by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a think tank in Washington.


"This finding, perhaps more than any other, exemplifies the divide between the reform agenda of the past 16 years and the actual desires of the American public," a PDK poll analysis said.


Rob Goad is on leave from Rep. Luke Messer's office and is currently in New York City working for the Trump campaign, according to sources.


The dispute began in 2011, when the U.S. Department of Education threatened to withhold in future years more than $112 million from South Carolina.


U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., is apparently a fan of Ken Burns' documentary "The Civil War" and thinks they can do the job typically done by teachers.


Can't get enough of public comments about proposed accountability regulations under the Every Student Succeeds Act? Here's some additional voices from the trove that now tops 21,000.


A look at previous federal guidance and proposals may offers clues to the Education Department's thinking as it prepares to issue spending rules under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


"Fault Lines: America's Most Segregating School District Borders" looks at student-poverty rates between adjacent districts, and examined more than 33,500 such district boundaries.


An analysis of the results from Education Next argues that it's hard to understand why members of the public are generally pleased with their local schools, given America's relative performance on international tests.


U.S. District Judge Reed O'Connor sided with Texas and 12 other state plaintiffs in his order for a temporary injunction, which bars the federal agencies from enforcing the guidance.


"On education, it is time to have school choice, merit pay for teachers, and to end the tenure policies that hurt good teachers and reward bad teachers," Trump told an audience in Milwaukee on Tuesday.


K-12 policy has been pretty far from the spotlight during the 2016 race. But to the extent Clinton's campaign has addressed it, Ann O'Leary has been front and center.


Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump both discussed child care issues recently, but what has Clinton said about her own involvement in creating Early Head Start, and what are the facts to back that up?


"We want to make sure students are leaving these programs with the skills and credentials they signed up for, and with manageable student debt," Under Secretary of Education Ted Mitchell said about new EQUIP partnerships.


Several education advocacy groups have harshly criticized a Federal Bureau of Investigation program designed to prevent the spread of "violent extremism" in American schools.


For Trump, it was a noteworthy pivot to a domestic policy issue that has not been at the forefront of his campaign thus far. Clinton's response, three days after Trump's comments, was to criticize him.


Evan McMullin, a former CIA officer who used to work as a Republican congressional staffer, said school choice is an important issue for him.


Those involved in the opt-out movement said they were strongly motivated by opposition to test-based teacher evaluations and the private sector's influence in schools, the survey reported.


In "No Time to Lose," there are echoes of "A Nation at Risk," the landmark 1983 report produced by a commission for President Ronald Reagan.


"Many questions remain before states can fully take advantage of ESSA," says a new report about the federal K-12 law from the Education Commission of the States.


Under No Child Left Behind waivers, some states didn't do such a hot job of monitoring districts' progress on things like school improvement and implementation of college- and career-ready standards, according to a report released Monday by the Government Accountability Office, Congress' investigative arm.


Details have yet to be released, but the GOP presidential nominee's proposal would appear to significantly depart from current tax policy governing child-care costs.


Some guess that if elected president, Hillary Clinton would choose someone with a higher education focus or experience as a governor to run the Education Department.


States that want to ditch "fill-in-the-bubble" tests and replace them with new competency-based tests will get the chance, thanks to a new grant competition.


The new K-12 policy platform from a coalition that includes Black Lives Matter calls for a constitutional amendment for education funding, and also seeks state-level ballot initiatives to provide additional resources for education.


The education community has turned in more than 20,000 comments on draft school accountability regulations for the Every Student Succeeds Act, with a wide range of perspectives.


What did Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican nominee Donald Trump say about education at their respective party conventions last month?


U.S. Sen. Patty Murray and Rep. Bobby Scott say the Education Department should rethink its requirements for how schools are held accountable for struggling groups of students.


The Washington Democrat is "just ecstatic" about the prospect of working with a possible President Hillary Clinton on expanding access to early-childhood education.


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