September 2016 Archives

The Andrew half of Politics K-12 was on a PBS Newshour earlier this month chatting about Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump, and where they stand on K-12. He was joined by Inside Higher Education's Scott Jaschik, who talked about higher educaiton issues.

School choice advocates are generally pleased that Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has released a plan to expand educational options—but that doesn't mean they don't have any concerns about his proposal.

Holton, whose husband, Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia, is Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's running mate, is Virginia's former education secretary and an ambassador of sorts for the campaign.

The U.S. Department of Education Tuesday released a blueprint to help states and districts make the most of out of more than $2 billion in federal money for teacher support, preparation, training, and more.

Before a watch party in Las Vegas for the Sept. 26 presidential debate, students on a nearby high school's debate team share their thoughts on the campaign and nominees.

Though child-care access got a quick and early shout-out, K-12 education received no substantive discussion as Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and GOP contender Donald Trump clashed.

Is there a smart way for presidential nominees Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump to prepare for their debates? Some research on cramming and study techniques suggests some possible answers.

If Education Week readers had their way, the candidates would be talking about teacher recruitment, educational equity, and the Every Student Succeeds Act at the first presidential debate Monday.

On Thursday, the House passed the Supporting Youth Opportunity and Preventing Delinquency Act of 2016 by a vote of 382-29. It's a proposed retooling of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act, which was first passed in 1974.

States and districts that get federal funding to support English-learners can use that money to help track long-term ELLs and ELLs with learning disabilities, as well as to help figure out how former ELLs are progressing, according to guidance released Friday.

Those eagerly awaiting mentions of education in every campaign stump speech, town hall, and debate would have enjoyed the 2000 presidential contest.

Randi Weingarten, the president of the American Federation of Teachers, says Hillary Clinton has made it clear to teachers that her K-12 policy won't look like the first six years of President Barack Obama' administration.

King, who probably has just a few months left in office, spoke to reporters about a range of issues at a breakfast hosted by the Christian Science Monitor.

Republicans say the Education Department is going too far in its attempts to regulate the requirement that federal money for schools supplement state and local K-12 aid.

U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King, Jr. visited half a dozen Southern states, with stops touching on education from pre-K to college.

The U.S. Secretary of Education talks with Politics K-12 about the administration's accomplishments and on setting the stage for implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's campaign has been creating a decent amount of education-related news recently, after several months in which Trump mostly made only cursory mentions of the topic.

Following the House of Representative's lead, there's a new bill in the Senate to reauthorize the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act—but what's in it?

The Education Department is outlining how states, districts, and schools can use interventions with a strong record of making a difference with the types of students or schools that need help.

Supporting Youth Opportunity and Preventing Delinquency Act of 2016, if approved, would become the newest version of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act.

You can now watch our short video explainer about what the common core is ... and what it's not.

Trump, accompanied by his daughter Ivanka, outlined a proposal that includes child care as a deductible business expense and incentives for businesses to provide on-site day care.

The full House approved a bill that was unanimously backed by the chamber's education committee in July, and gives states some additional flexibility when it comes to CTE.

The requirement for evidence-based interventions under ESSA has the power to help schools make academic gains, but smart implementation will be key, according to two recent reports.

The Government Accountability Office also says the Education Department should give states and districts guidance on this issue.

U.S. Secretary of Education John King kicked off a bus tour Monday that will go through six states and eleven cities and towns, ending in New Orleans on Friday at a charter school that has seen a significant turnaround.

Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., had this message in an appearance before Kentucky legislators: Assume you can do as you please under the Every Student Succeeds Act.

Dozens of educators and advocates offered the U.S. Department of Education their thoughts on how testing and an "innovative assessment" pilot should work under the Every Student Succeeds Act.

The list of experts in her education policy working group run the gamut from folks who are arguably sympathetic to the education redesign wing of the party to the presidents of both national teachers' unions.

The GOP presidential nominee says he'd be the "nation's biggest cheerleader for school choice" and would offer states the chance to use $20 billion in federal money to create vouchers.

Donald Trump recently proposed ending federal spending caps on the military. How could that impact what Washington spends on public schools?

Thirty-five years ago this week, in its very first issue, Education Week published details of a memo written by the Education Secretary taking aim at the department itself.

With the Every Student Succeeds Act on the books, many believe the next president won't be able to put a big stamp on federal K-12 policy. Let's examine that assumption.

It's that time again! The U.S. Secretary of Education will be embarking on the department's annual back-to-school bus tour.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump told an American Legion convention Thursday that he wants school children to regularly say the pledge of allegiance, and learn patriotism. He's also recently said the nation could use the money it spends on undocumented immigrants on school choice.

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