October 2016 Archives

The resegregation of the nation's schools might be one of the hottest issues in education policy these days. But it's never really penetrated the 2016 presidential race.


There's little more than a week left in the 2016 presidential race, so what what are some of the latest developments relevant for education?


"School counselors fill many roles by helping students work through serious social, emotional, academic and personal challenges," Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. said in a statement announcing the expansion.


Hillary Clinton, the Democratic presidential nominee, is pitching a $500 million program to help states and schools combat bullying.


Montana Superintendent Denise Juneau, who's running for Congress, has carried on a family legacy in education that has roots on the Blackfeet reservation.


There's no hard-and-fast evidence that Race to the Top, Obama administration's $4 billion, signature K-12 initiative had a long-term impact on student achievement or state policy, according to a report released Wednesday by the Institute for Education Sciences, the U.S. Department of Education's research arm.


Tax returns and confidential emails has come up more often than K-12 education this election season. But that actually has a big upside, some experts say.


Under ESSA, states and districts will get much more say when it comes to turning around their lowest performing schools.


If Democrats gain control in one or both chambers, who's likely to head the key K-12 committees in Congress? And what does that mean for education policy?


There's a change from the No Child Left Behind Act to the Every Student Succeeds Act in the calculation of how much Title I money districts must distribute to private schools for equitable services.


Conservative Leaders for Education is looking to add state lawmakers to influence the Every Student Succeeds Act in states and counterbalance the power of other groups like the teachers' unions.


Former Hillary Clinton aide Mildred Otero and Buffalo, N.Y. school board member Carl Paladino spoke about the candidates' views at a forum in Miami hosted by the Council of the Great City Schools Oct. 21.


To answer questions about the graduation-rate gap between groups of students, U.S. Secretary of Education John King went straight to the source: high school kids.


Guidance released Friday makes it clear that well-rounded means more than just music and arts, even though those are important. It can include everything from foreign language courses to Advanced Placement to civics education to college and career counseling.


It has been a long, parched walk in the desert for attention to education in the debates between presidential nominees Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.


There are nine other positions in a Donald Trump presidential cabinet you can make suggestions for in the survey, as well as a new chief of staff for Trump.


More civics education could help kids become the type of citizens who will be able to smartly work against the forces of inequity in their communities, U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King, Jr. planned to say a speech at the National Press Club Wednesday.


The National Center for Education Statistics reports that K-12 spending at the state and district level increased by 1.2 percent from fiscal 2013 to fiscal 2014.


The national graduation rate hit an all-time high at 83.2 percent for the 2014-15 school year, up nearly 5 percentage points since the 2010-11 school year. But there's more to the story.


Nearly every secretary came into the job with a long record in K-12 policy. But, if Hillary Clinton is elected president next month, she may break with that longstanding tradition and choose someone with a higher education background.


High school graduation rates inched up for the fourth year in a row, by nearly one percentage point in the 2014-15 school year, the Obama administration announced Monday.


The union wants more than just a few tweaks to the accountability plans that were already on the books under the No Child Left Behind Act and its waivers.


In the speech to an ed-tech company, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton also expressed skepticism that most politicians aside from governors or mayors can exert much influence on K-12.


The U.S. Department of Education today released its long-awaited final rules on teacher preparation. The rules, first proposed in 2014, aim to hold teacher-training programs accountable for the performance of their graduates.


Zephyr Teachout, the Democratic candidate in New York's 19th district, opposes high-stakes testing and the common core, while GOP candidate John Faso is a big charter school fan.


The union had heard that Joel Klein, the former New York City School chancellor, was working with the campaign, and it was not pleased.


Want a crash course in how education is playing out in the presidential campaign? Check out this video, featuring both halves of Politics K-12.


Teachers have seen an uptick in bullying in schools thanks to GOP nominee Donald Trump's rhetoric, said his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton at the debate in St. Louis.


Denise Juneau, the Democratic Montana superintendent of public instruction who's seeking the state's at-large seat in the U.S. House of Representatives, has rejected tying tying teacher evaluations to test scores and school turnaround strategies promoted by Washington.


A federal audit examined 33 schools in six states and found several examples of conflicts of interest, related-party transactions, and insufficient segregation of duties—all controls designed to prevent fraud.


Last month, the department released "Supporting School Reform by Leveraging Federal Funds in a Schoolwide Program." It specifies how schools can use federal money to drive comprehensive turnaround efforts under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


Vice-presidential nominees Tim Kaine and Mike Pence have long records on education. But neither of them talked very much about them in their first and only debate, at Longwood University in Farmville, Va.


We took a look at how schools in Virginia and Indiana stacked up on the "nation's report card" during the years that Tim Kaine, the Democratic vice-presidential nominee, and Mike Pence, the Republican vice-presidential pick, were in their governors' mansions.


The National Education Association says Donald Trump's campaign rhetoric has led to an increase in school bullying. But one researcher says it's too soon to draw that conclusion


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