November 2016 Archives

In a radio interview, Dick DeVos Jr., husband of the U.S. Secretary of Education nominee, also said she had never met President-elect Donald Trump until after the election.


Betsy DeVos' views on civil rights issues for students and protections for disadvantaged learners and other student groups are less well-known than her support for school choice.


States get greater flexibility on school ratings, schools with high testing opt-out rates, and in other areas than under a draft version of the ESSA regulations.


President-elect Donald Trump has tapped Betsy DeVos, a longtime school choice advocate and Republican mega-donor, to be his education secretary, he announced Wednesday.


DeVos, chosen by President-elect Donald Trump to head the Education Department, has been a major national advocate of school choice, including tuition vouchers.


Rhee met with Trump last Saturday, ramping up speculation that she would be Trump's nominee to lead the U.S. Department of Education.


With the dust still settling from the Nov. 8 election, who will prosper under Donald Trump's presidency, and who'll be wearing sackcloth and ashes in the political wilderness?


"The use of corporal punishment can hinder the creation of a positive school climate by focusing on punitive measures to address student misbehavior rather than positive behavioral interventions and supports," King wrote in a letter to state officials.


The folks on President-elect Donald Trump's education transition team will help set the policy course—and likely, even appoint key personnel—for the new administration.


President-elect Donald Trump met with two education leaders Saturday: former Washington, D.C. schools chancellor Michelle Rhee and Betsy DeVos, a school choice advocate.


The last time a president's child attended public school was in the late 1970s during Jimmy Carter's presidency. The question now is where will President-elect Donald Trump's son go?


The president-elect's search for an education secretary appears to be crossing party lines as he plans to meet with the former District of Columbia Public Schools Chancellor.


The petition seems inspired by some of the names in the rumor mill for education secretary, including some who have backed the common core or not actively opposed it.


President-elect Donald Trump's biggest education pitch during the presidential campaign was for a $20 billion voucher program that students could use at both public and private schools.


U.S. Secetary of Education John King told reporters Thursday that he wants to ensure a smooth transition for the incoming Trump administration.


Are you ready for the next round of federal elections and their potential to change education policy? Maybe not—but either way, let's look at the landscape.


In addition to the many Republican stalwarts mentioned as possible education secretary candidates, former D.C. schools boss Michelle Rhee and charter school powerhouse Eva Moskowitz stand out.


Murray took over as the committee's number one Democrat in 2015, after control of the Senate flipped to Republicans. She was am architect of the Every Student Succeeds Act.


Republican Rep. Luke Messer of Indiana, one of the foremost champions for school choice in Congress, said he's excited for the "big and bold" education plans he foresees under President-elect Donald Trump.


Spearman, a Republican elected in 2014, thinks that a Trump administration will give states more freedom to interpret things like ESSA spending requirements than President Barack Obama's administration has so far.


The President-elect doesn't have a track record on education, which means that his pick will send a really important signal on where he wants to go on policy.


The incoming Trump administration will likely embrace ESSA's local control spirit—and could seek changes to pending rules, current and former GOP Hill staffers predict.


President-elect Donald Trump's education secretary, whoever it is, won't be able to follow through on one of the campaign's signature education promises: scapping the common core standards.


The election of Donald Trump to the White House could be a major curve ball for implementation of the nearly year-old Every Student Succeeds Act.


With Donald Trump headed to the White House and the GOP controlling Congress, Republicans have their best chance yet to scrap—or seriously scale back—the Education Department.


In the last round of federal Investing in Innovation grants under President Obama, the competition intended to find and build up research-based educational interventions has borne its first full fruit.


The North Carolina Republican long has been rumored to be a top candidates to replace the outgoing chairman, Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., who is retiring.


President-elect Donald Trump also will work to ensure "a new way of how to deliver public education," said Gerard Robinson, a former Florida and Virginia state chief.


Although public school policy wasn't a particularly big issue during the 2016 campaign, Congress could still get very busy when it comes to education in general.


The real estate executive has largely ignored education during his successful presidential bid, except for a $20 billion federal investment in school choice he announced in September.


The National Education Associated reported that seven times more members volunteered this election season than back in 2012.


Public school policy has mostly been ignored in the race for the White House, and sadly for many of you education wonks, not much has changed. But it is voting day, so we've got a quick refresher for you on the candidates' education policies.


Over two dozen GOP members of Congress want the U.S. Department of Education to rescind its proposed spending rules for the Every Student Succeeds Act.


The proposed ESSA rules say this: "Nothing in this section should be construed to require the forced or involuntary transfer of any school personnel."


From 1951 to 1955, the FBI distributed intelligence reports about those suspected as political subversives to governors, police departments, Red Cross officials, and other prominent civic leaders.


A bipartisan group of U.S. senators wrote to the president in September criticizing proposed Education Department rules for the Every Student Succeeds Act, which passed by overwhelming margins last year.


Just like in the real presidential contest, there were sharp divides along racial lines in a mock presidential election conducted by the ed-tech company Newsela.


Both Hillary Clinton, the Democratic nominee for president, and her GOP opponent, Donald Trump, have sketched out bare-bones plans to improve the teaching profession. But neither has offered hard-and-fast details.


King plans to say that access to a low-quality early learning program is a, "false promise" and a "missed opportunity" in a speech at the University of Virginia Wednesday.


A plan proposed by the group representing state schools superintendents would avoid forcing districts to pick between four options for distributing state and local school aid.


As states continue to address the Common Core State Standards in various ways, more and more people have been wondering about the common core's status nationally.


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