February 2017 Archives

President Donald Trump championed school choice without delving into specifics during his first address to a joint session of Congress.


Those sentiments at a White House meeting with college presidents ignited a firestorm on social media, with numerous folks saying on Twitter that HBCUs were set up in response to segregation.


The top two Democrats on education in Congress want the education secretary to flesh out her announced plan to audit programs at the department and cut unnecessary ones.


President Donald Trump reportedly wants to boost defense spending by $54 billion and cut domestic discretionary spending by that much, which could have a big impact on education aid.


The president's Tuesday night speech could give the country a glimpse of education's place among his priorities, or signal that education won't be a major focus.


The U.S. secretary of education urged attendees at the Conservative Political Action Conference to help fight those she said have stymied access to school choice and quality schools.


Although there was intense opposition from Democrats and activists to the education secretary's nomination, some wonder whether that detracted from opposition to nominees like Attorney General Jeff Sessions.


Without any regulations for a requirement that federal spending supplement state and local aid to schools, districts could be entering a new area of flexibility under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


President Donald Trump—who didn't talk much about K-12 education on the campaign trail—picked an education secretary in Betsy DeVos with whom he doesn't have close, long-standing ties.


Educators at Washington, D.C.'s Jefferson Middle School Academy did not take kindly the education secretary's comment after a school visit that "they're waiting to be told what to do."


The American Federation of Teachers and the National Education Association were major opponents of the new education secretary during her confirmation process, saying she would hurt public schools.


Amid the turnover accompanying the 115th Congress, you might have missed changes to staff investigative authority that affect the education committee in the House of Representatives.


In her third interview on conservative talk radio, the U.S. Secretary of Education also said ESSA "essentially does away with the notion of the common core."


The U.S. Secretary of Education's remarks in Washington came at her first public speech, where she celebrated magnet schools without committing to seeking additional funds for them.


Some Republicans say the education secretary's preliminary team is heavy on political hands and light on policy heft. Some would-be hires worry about working for a divisive secretary.


"We'll be examining and auditing and reviewing all of the programs," DeVos told the host of a Michigan radio program in a Tuesday interview.


A group of public, private, and home-school parents and educators met with President Donald Trump and Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos in a White House listening session.


These ESSA rules that are now on thin ice set the timeline for how schools are rated, measuring "consistently underperforming" groups of students, and other key issues.


In her first print and radio interviews since taking office, the new secretary of education opened to conservative opinion journalists about her rocky confirmation process.


Last year, Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., oversaw a federal spending bill for education in the House that cut the department's overall budget of $68 billion by $1.3 billion.


The Obama administration's accountability regulations for the Every Student Succeeds Act have been paused by the Trump administration, and they're are on thin ice in Congress. But U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos wants states to keep going on their ESSA plans.


The new secretary of education's visit to the school was previously publicized by the Washington Teachers Union president, who urged protesters to meet her. And her visit to Howard University earlier this week generated angst as well.


Betsy DeVos as education secretary could energize her opponents to open their wallets and pound the pavement for Democratic candidates, including in states with key Senate elections in 2018.


The new U.S. Secretary of Education sought to address questions about her qualifications, saying that she's open to learning from the department's staff and from educators in the field.


New U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, who was sworn in after one of the most heated confirmation processes in history, will address Education Department employees Wednesday, at 2 p.m.


Trump's adviser made the claim on CNN, but states, not the federal government, adopt content standards like the common core. And current federal law prohibits the Trump administration from influencing states' decisions about standards.


Some educators and advocacy groups are already bracing for a new kind of relationship with the federal agency under new U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.


The possible end of the ESSA accountability rules finalized last year could have far-reaching consequences for the U.S. Department of Education, state officials, and local district leaders say.


School choice supporters are really happy. Civil rights organizations and teachers' unions not so much. Check out what organizations across the political spectrum said after DeVos' confirmation.


Billionaire school choice advocate Betsy DeVos squeaked across the finish line to win Senate confirmation as President Donald Trump's secretary of education, with Vice President Mike Pence breaking the tie.


If the vote proceeds as expected, Vice President Mike Pence would be called on to cast the deciding vote on the nominee for education secretary in a starkly divided Senate.


Some of the Democrats who seemed most eager to oppose the education secretary nominee are among those being floated in the media and elsewhere as possible 2020 presidential contenders.


Businesses and advocacy groups are urge Congress to revamp and increase funding for the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act to help the president deliver on his economic promises.


By a party-line vote of 52-48, the Senate voted to close debate on DeVos' nomination by President Donald Trump, which has sparked a controversy unlike any seen before over a potential secretary of education.


Three new staffers with experience in education policy circles joined the list of political aides smoothing the way for the Trump administration to take over the U.S. Department of Education.


King, who served as President Barack Obama's education secretary, will be only the second leader in Ed Trust's history, taking over for Kati Haycock, its CEO and founder.


"We are sending a signal that we are unhappy with these regs," said Tyler Hernandez, a spokesman for the House education committee.


Without another Republican senator joining the two who say they'll vote against the education secretary nominee, the tally appears to be 50-50, assuming all Democrats vote "no."


It's unclear whether President Donald Trump's $20 billion federal voucher plan has legs. But don't mistake that for a lack of overall enthusiasm among GOP lawmakers for expanding school choice.


The recommendations include ideas like collecting better data on student outcomes, improving access to early childhood education, and beefing-up teacher quality.


"She clearly said to me that the states need to be in control of a lot of these decisions," said Chris Minnich, the executive director of the Council of Chief State School Officers.


Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, said they would vote against DeVos over concerns about her track record with and knowledge of public schools.


A 2015 Senate vote on a federal school choice bill provides a clue about which senators might not be big DeVos fans.


The short answer: Maybe not quite as much as you might think. For one thing, the Every Student Succeeds Act doesn't give her much running room.


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