April 2017 Archives

Michigan's lieutenant governor says the plan, which the state submitted earlier this month, should be changed in order to better account for special education students.


Critics of the federally funded voucher program quickly pounced on the study's findings to throw cold water on the Trump administration's push to expand private school voucher programs.


The Government Accountability Office says the U.S. Department of Education "lacks useful data" about the impact 21st Century Community Learning Center programs have on children's attendance and discipline.


The biggest state beneficiaries of the program, which is linked to revenue derived from timber harvests on federal lands, include Oregon, California, and Idaho.


The executive order seems to be a not-so-veiled shot at the Obama administration, which used federal funding to entice states to adopt the Common Core State Standards and more.


The comment came in a Fox News interview when Education Secretary Betsy DeVos was asked if she would withhold federal money from states that use the standards.


A coalition of advocacy organizations are concerned about U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos' early moves with respect to civil rights, including her pick as acting head of the office for civil rights.


The U.S. Department of Education's press secretary comes from the office of a Texas Republican member of Congress.


Since taking office, President Donald Trump has made some notable moves on K-12, but his early days look different in many respects than those of his two most immediate predecessors.


The education secretary and the American Federation of Teachers president agree the Van Wert district is great, but don't see eye-to-eye on vouchers, the budget, and more.


Holly Luong Ham, who will oversee the department's office of management, is joining the list of recent appointments to work under Secretary Betsy DeVos.


So far, 12 states and the District of Columbia have informed the U.S. Department of Education about how they'll approach accountability under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


It remains to be seen if Thursday's visit by the education secretary and the teachers' union president to rural Van Wert will turn out to be a love feast.


The blank spots in state plans could set up an interesting test for Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, who has made local control a watchword for her department.


On April 28, the measure Congress approved late last year to keep the government funded for the rest of fiscal 2017 will expire.


Tax-credit scholarships could be one of several ways that President Donald Trump's administration and Congress could use to promote school choice from Washingto


Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos supported rescinding the Obama administration's guidance on transgender students, but she's also argued that protecting all students from bullying and harassment is one of her top priorities.


Many of these folks have been working in the education department since the beginning of the Trump administration, but now they will have more formal, official roles.


Of the nine state plans released so far, at least five include—or plan to include—academic or extracurricular subjects beyond reading and math.


Under the Every Student Succeeds Act, states have a lot of leeway in deciding what their long-term academic goals will be. A look at their goals reveals that states are taking advantage of that flexibility.


A number of advocacy groups and research organizations have—or are planning to create—some ESSA resources for states and advocacy groups.


Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos has talked up the section of ESSA that allows states to set aside 3 percent of their Title I money to promote "direct student services" including course choice.


Sources say lawmakers are seriously considering turning the law's Title IV funding into a competitive-grant program at the state level, at least temporarily.


The Secure Rural Schools program is designed to provide additional support for schools and local governments impacted by activities on federal lands and is linked to revenue from timber harvests on those lands.


One of the parts of the Every Student Succeeds Act that excited educators the most was the chance to look beyond test-scores in gauging school performance.


This is the secretary of education's third visit to school choice-friendly Florida, a state she recently described as a model for the nation on K-12 policy.


The states that submitted plans by the April 3 deadline take varied approaches when dealing with schools that fail to hit test-participation requirements in the Every Student Succeeds Act.


States have many decisions to make about how they'll grade schools in their Every Student Succeeds Act plans, including whether to issue summative ratings or used dashboards.


At a gathering of business executives on April 4, President Donald Trump also repeated pledges he made on the campaign trail about the Common Core State Standards and the role of Washington in K-12


The bill, which passed on a voice vote, makes changes to data collection and reporting and to the contact juveniles can have with adult inmates, among other provisions.


At least nine states and the District of Columbia had turned in their plans to the feds, or were planning to by the end of Monday.


Here's what to look for on the goals states are setting, how they are rating schools, and what their plans are for school improvement under the new law.


Carlos Muniz, who worked for former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, will serve as the agency's general counsel, if confirmed by the U.S. Senate.


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