May 2017 Archives

The politics of education have been cast in a new light thanks to the election of President Donald Trump, and a panel at the Education Writers Association annual meeting on Wednesday reflected the shifting currents for K-12.


The $250 million grant program for private school vouchers in the president's proposed budget has quickly become a flash point for both friends and foes of school choice.


The National Governors Association sent a letter about education funding two days after the release of President Donald Trump's spending blueprint, which proposes a 13.5 percent cut to the Education Department.


We sat down with the superintendent of Maryland's second-largest school district to get his views on the president's proposed budget for education.


In defending the president's budget on Capitol Hill, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos implored lawmakers to focus on "students and their education," rather than "schools and systems." Democrats weren't buying it.


President Donald Trump's 2018 federal spending plan would cut close to 4 percent from formula-based Title I aid, while earmarking new money for public school choice.


Many responses to the fiscal 2018 budget proposal focused on plans to cut 13 percent of the Education Department's budget, eliminate or reduce programs, and increase funding for school choice.


The president's 2018 fiscal plan would cut spending for teacher development, after-school enrichment, and career and technical education, but faces an uncertain future in Congress.


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos excoriated foes of school choice in a speech to an advocacy group, but didn't give details about the Trump administration's proposals to expand it.


We already know the basics of how President Donald Trump wants to handle spending at the U.S. Department of Education, but there are several outstanding questions ahead of the official budget release Tuesday.


President Donald Trump swept into office in January with grand visions of dramatically expanding school choice. That was, of course, before a swarm of very negative headlines concerning Trump, Russia, and the FBI.


If peer reviewers want to recommend against approving a state's ESSA plan, the lack of permanent political staffers could become an issue, some experts say.


The GAO looked at a sample of 75 federal grants. And almost all of them—69—were incomplete in some way in terms of oversight, according to the report.


The U.S. secretary of education will address the school choice advocacy organization she chaired and helped found, speaking at its national convention in Indianapolis, a source said.


The soon-to-be-released federal budget plan would cut more than $9 billion from the Education Department, while leveraging $1 billion in grant money for public school choice, the Washington Post said.


The Rebuild America's Schools Act of 2017 would be tailored for schools in high-poverty areas and direct money to high-speed broadband internet and school construction.


The measure moves on to the full House for consideration, and could become the first major education legislation sent to President Donald Trump this Congress.


The legislation would get rid of the Congressional Review Act, which allows Congress to overturn newly finalized federal regulations, like those that President Barack Obama administration wrote to govern accountability and state plans for ESSA.


The bipartisan proposal would create a new federal database designed to provide more information about colleges and universities to prospective students, but would boost data collection requirements and could face an uphill climb in Congress.


A bill to reauthorize the federal law governing career- and technical-education programs has been introduced and will soon be considered in the House education committee chaired by Rep. Virginia Foxx, R-N.C.


Tim Kelly, a GOP member of the state legislature, told the Detroit News he expects DeVos to tap him as assistant secretary of technical and adult education.


The 11-year-old son of President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump will attend St. Andrew's Episcopal School in Potomac, Md., a spokeswoman for the first lady said.


The new administration is a whole new ball game for folks in Washington pushing on behalf of public educators, the civil rights community, and K-12 funding.


After passing a preliminary bar with the U.S. Department of Education, a batch of states are ready for their Every Student Succeeds Act plans to be vetted in peer review.


The Associated Press reported Thursday that ex-Rep. Corrine Brown of Florida was convicted on 18 of the 22 counts made against her.


At least six states plans have been deemed complete by the U.S. Department of Education.


The federal aid set asides can be used for direct student services and teacher and principal development, but they're not proving particularly popular among states that have submitted ESSA plans so far.


Expanding school choice is the Trump administration's favorite K-12 policy, but the administration has yet to release a detailed proposal explaining how it plans to make that a reality.


We highlight what states want to do with respect to goals, school ratings, academic indicators, and other indicators that are a part of ESSA plans submitted by states.


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos has had plenty to say over the years about the importance of paying the best teachers more—and getting rid of teachers who aren't effective.


The American Health Care Act, which the House of Representatives voted to approve, contains significant changes to Medicaid that some education-oriented groups say will harm services for children in school.


The legislation introduced Thursday to revamp the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act is similar to a bipartisan bill that passed the House last year.


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos hasn't been up to Capitol Hill to testify on the Trump administration's budget yet. But when she does, she may want to take some cues from her predecessor, Terrel H. Bell.


The president praised a District of Columbia voucher program for its high graduation rate, but left out a recent study casting doubt on its impact on students' academic achievement.


Lawmakers are allowing states to distribute funds for the Student Support and Academic Enrichment grants competitively, instead of by formula.


In the proposed deal covering the rest of fiscal 2017 through September, after-school programs would get an increase, but teacher development grants would see a notable cut.


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