June 2017 Archives

Will this round of feedback to a fresh group of states on their Every Student Succeeds Act plans give fans of local control yet another case of heartburn?


States will get an extra year to comply with new financial transparency requirements in the Every Student Succeeds that are aimed at shining a light on school district spending.


Even a speculative, dark-horse Zuckerberg run could have implications for education policy, in part because the Facebook mogul plans to pour billions of dollars into K-12 education.


We've put together a list of policy issues that the 115th Congress could at least in theory address, ranging from higher education to student data privacy.


Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., and 33 other Democratic senators have major concerns with the direction of the civil rights enforcement under U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.


There's barely a whisper about the Common Core standards in the 17 Every Student Succeeds Act plans that have been turned in so far.


More than two dozen experts took a look at state plans for the Every Student Succeeds Act to gauge big strengths and weaknesses.


State plans for the Every Student Succeeds Act are a gold mine for the kind of language that can seem incredibly and at times comically dense to those outside of the education field. But let's try to quantify it.


The Alliance for Excellent Education, which focuses on college-and-career readiness and students from low-income backgrounds among others, has released "equity dashboards" for five states' ESSA plans.


The National Science Teachers Foundation is worried that the U.S. Department of Education is improperly discouraging states from using science in school accountability systems under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


The education secretary is looking at 150 regulations and 1,677 pieces of policy guidance, to see what should be tossed.


Like the Every Student Succeeds Act, the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act gives more decision-making and funding authority to states.


As the Senate health care plan is introduced, see how efforts to replace "Obamacare" could impact the nation's schools when it comes to special education funding, teacher benefits, and more.


A letter from the Congressional Black Caucus highlighted proposed Trump administration budget cuts and its decision to nix a school diversity program among the reasons for refusing another meeting with the president.


The Council of Chief State School Officers Wednesday released a list of school improvement principles that states may want to use to guide their ESSA work.


A Federal Register notice asks the education community to identify guidance and regulations that are driving up costs, or creating extra work for states, districts, and educators.


At least eight states want to use AP, IB, and dual enrollment scores to show kids are college-ready under ESSA. DeVos and company may not approve.


Lawmakers created, debated, and passed what became the Every Student Succeeds Act with significantly more transparency than how lawmakers are dealing with the current health care overhaul, but there are a couple of parallels.


Last week, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee sent out a fundraising email with the subject line, "DeVos STEALS Georgia."


The Trump administration has been under political pressure to explain its extensive early feedback on state plans to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act.


The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights launched a two-year investigation into civil rights practices under the Trump administration, including at the U.S. Department of Education.


The department has instructed regional directors to focus on incidents where transgender students might have been harassed and bullied, but did not address questions about facilities access.


The Council of Chief State School Officers is expressing concern that some of the Trump team's feedback to states would actually go beyond the scope of the law.


The IDEA Full Funding Act, introduced Thursday, would ramp up Washington's budget for students with special needs.


The top Democrat on the Senate education committee is expressing dismay at a report from ProPublica that the U.S. Department of Education is rethinking its approach to civil rights.


What are the most common strategies states want to take for school improvement? Are states seeking radical new approaches under ESSA? We take a look.


Delaware, Nevada, and New Mexico must supply a detailed list of information to get their plans for the Every Student Succeeds Act approved by the U.S. Department of Education.


Stay innovative and don't turn into another group of entrenched paper pushers, the U.S. secretary of education cautions members of the nation's largest charter school organization.


There are some serious rifts in the charter community when it comes to how to react to President Donald Trump, DeVos, and their gung-ho school choice agenda.


Sources say Jim Blew, director of Student Success California, a 50CAN affiliate, is a top contender to lead the office of planning, evaluation, and policy analysis.


If the department ultimately rejects Alabama's request, it will be a signal that—even though local control is a watch-word of the Trump administration—that there are some clear limitations to that idea.


Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., said Secretary DeVos pledged that any federally backed voucher program would require participating schools to fully comply with national special education law. But what does that law say about the issue?


In a Senate budget hearing Tuesday, DeVos repeatedly told lawmakers that, "Schools that receive federal funds must follow federal law, period." But she also left questions unanswered about discrimination with respect to voucher programs.


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos told senators at a budget hearing that she wouldn't subject states' Every Student Succeeds Act plans to her personal policy preferences. But that didn't satisfy everyone.


At a Capitol Hill hearing, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos faced Republicans skeptical about slashing some programs, and Democrats worried about civil rights protections under any federally funded vouchers.


President Trump has tapped Peter Oppenheim to serve as an assistant secretary in the education department. And U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos has named new aides for special education and higher ed.


In a recent radio interview, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos expanded on a topic that caused a lot of controversy in the education world during her confirmation hearing.


A Heritage Foundation report says children from military families deserve more educational options and eyes the $1.3 billion federal Impact Aid program as a vehicle.


The District of Columbia, under federal government supervision, has done a good job providing education options to families, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos said in a school visit there.


The U.S. Secretary of Education hasn't appeared publicly before the Senate education committee since her confirmation hearing in January, but Democratic senators haven't stopped bird-dogging her.


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