July 2017 Archives

Will parents be able to understand their child's school's performance under the Every Student Succeeds Act? And will schools with students from difficult socioeconomic backgrounds get a fair shake?


Sen. Patty Murray and Rep. Bobby Scott told Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos that her department's plan for phone calls prior to written feedback is problematic.


Rep. John Delaney is the author of the "Early Learning Act" that is designed to help states move towards universal pre-kindergarten.


Should the overhaul effort catch fire once again, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., could play a key role in the process, competing for his committee's attention.


Upcoming legislation from an Alabama Democrat is designed to prevent "double-dipping" by donors to state organizations that provide private school scholarships.


Stung by criticism from its first round of responses, the department is giving states a chance to explain their plans over the phone before issuing official letters.


Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos hasn't really weighed in decisively with her thoughts on school discipline, which was an area of significant interest for the Obama administration.


President Donald Trump plans to donate his $100,000 salary for this quarter to the agency, to help pay for a camp focused on science, technology, engineering, and math, or STEM.


Rep. Luke Messer was first elected to the House of Representatives in 2012, and has been one of the foremost supporters of choice since then


States refusal to change their plans for the Every Student Succeeds Act based on the department's feedback could put U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos and her team in a tough spot.


Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., said Tuesday she wants to protect the GOP legislation from causing "decimating" cuts to traditional Medicaid


How anxious or pleased should you be about the $2 billion cut to educator-training programs in the House education spending bill? Hold off before you decide.


U.S. Reps. Luke Messer and Todd Rokita, both Indiana Republicans, are big fans of school choice and could seek the GOP nomination for Indiana's U.S. Senate seat in 2018.


The U.S. secretary of education has been in office for going on six months and has been way more active on higher education than on K-12.


The U.S. secretary of education told those gathered for a conference of the conservative ALEC group that she supports a smaller federal role in education and encouraged states to pursue school choice.


The legislation would cut less from the U.S. Department of Education than President Donald Trump wanted, and now moves on to the full House of Representatives.


The long-term targets states have put forward in the Every Student Succeeds Act have gotten a lot of attention, positive and negative. But there's something else to keep in mind about those goals.


After years of federal direction on school improvement, states and districts will get a much freer hand with turning around low-performing schools under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


At a hearing, Republicans and Democrats alike raise questions about whether the U.S. Department of Education is being consistent in its feedback to states on their Every Student Succeeds Act plans.


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos reiterated her call for vouchers and other forms of school choice at a gathering Monday for special educators.


Republicans have made it clear they're concerned about Washington overreach concerning the Every Student Succeeds Act. But how do Democrats feel about what Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has done so far?


The U.S. secretary of education's handling of various civil rights issues has raised big concerns for Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., top Democrat on the Senate education committee.


The education secretary's comments came at the end of a daylong summit where she heard from survivors of sexual assault and students who have been accused of it.


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos' home state education chief thinks her department is sending confusing messages on how states should approach implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act.


The letter, written on behalf of the National Governors Association by Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington state and Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval of Nevada, connected early education to larger issues.


A House panel rejected it as part of the budget, and time is short for getting a tax-based school choice plan over the finish line this year.


The legislation lawmakers discussed on Thursday differs from the Trump administration's plan in several respects, but both plans would eliminate $2 billion in aid for teacher training.


The head of the Senate education committee, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., thinks Jason Botel, who is charged with implementing the law, should bone up on how the Every Student Succeeds Act limits the federal role.


The bill, released on Wednesday, would provide $66 billion for the U.S. Department of Education, down $2.4 billion from the current budget.


President Donald Trump came to Washington pledging to slash the federal workforce. He may be jumping on a train that's already left the station, at least as far as the U.S. Department of Education is concerned.


Early indications are that lawmakers aren't incredibly enthusiastic about what DeVos and President Donald Trump are proposing for Education Department spending.


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos will kick off the education department's summer reading program Wednesday at the Kennedy Center in Washington.


We've put together a snappy 58-second video that covers how federal K-12 spending would change, what the president wants to cut, and what he wants more money for.


The department has come under fire from states and their advocates for going overboard when it comes to providing feedback on ESSA plans.


What have states actually done in response to U.S. Department of Education feedback on their plans for the Every Student Succeeds Act? Here's Delaware's answer.


The U.S. secretary of education and her skeletal political staff will be spending the summer implementing the Every Student Succeeds Act, looking for regulations to cut, and more.


The Trump administration is sending some very troubling signals on civil rights, dozens of House Democratic lawmakers and seven senators wrote in a recent letter to U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.


There's been a ton of confusion lately about whether and how states can incorporate science, social studies, and other subjects into their systems for rating schools under ESSA.


Time already may be running out for U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos to get a sweeping school choice initiative over the finish line this year.


States aren't necessarily keen to toss overboard what they put in their waivers from the No Child Left Behind Act when crafting their direction under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


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