September 2017 Archives

Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price advocated for turning over control of Head Start programs to several states while serving in Congress.


Three White House commissions that address education issues for black, Hispanic, and Asian American and Pacific Islander students say they haven't met since President Donald Trump took office. And their time may be running out.


Jim Blew, the director of Student Success California, a 50CAN affiliate, has gotten the official White House nod to lead the office of planning, evaluation, and policy analysis at the U.S. Department of Education.


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos is followed by protestors almost everywhere she goes, but she faced an especially tough crowd at Harvard University Thursday.


The move could put a financial strain on states—and eventually, jeopardize coverage for the roughly 9 million children covered by the program.


The Republican framework for tax reform reportedly calls for the elimination of the state and local deduction available to taxpayers.


The GOP's "Unified Framework for Fixing a Broken Tax Code" does not mention any tax credit for donations to groups sponsoring scholarships to private schools.


DeVos got a higher share of strong disapproval than any other member of President Trump's cabinet included in the survey.


Michael Wooten, will head up the Office of Career, Technical and Adult Education, at least for now. Leonard Haynes, is likely to be a postsecondary education point person.


It's one of the most controversial questions about the Every Student Succeeds Act and accountability in general: How should schools be graded?


In a speech, the education secretary said she's working to slash federal regulations that, in her view, are tying school leaders' hands.


President Donald Trump is calling on the U.S. Department of Education to put a new focus on STEM education, even as his budget seeks to scrap one of the only federal pots of money that schools can use for education technology.


States' timelines under the Every Student Succeeds Act range from five to 15 years, and goals vary from modest annual improvements to 100 percent proficiency targets.


Attendance, particularly chronic absenteeism, and college-and-career readiness are by far the most popular new areas of focus for accountability in the ESSA plans from 40-plus states.


The former teacher, principal, and school superintendent became one of the most influential members of Congress on education policy during his 13 terms in the House.


Massachusetts is the 15th state so far to have its Every Student Succeeds Act plan approved by the U.S. Department of Education.


For teachers, parents, principals, and others, the Every Student Succeeds Act is no longer on the horizon. Now it's in their schools. Here's an EdWeek guide to all things ESSA.


Amid the Trump administration's push to slash federal red tape, educators, advocates, and parents tell the U.S. secretary of education they're worried about the effect that could have on historically overlooked groups of students.


Like previous recent efforts to overhaul health care and ditch Obamacare, the Graham-Cassidy legislation would significantly impact the $4 billion in Medicaid money schools receive annually.


Carlos Muñiz, only the second nominee to the Trump Education Department to have a hearing before the Senate education, addressed the Every Student Succeeds Act and transgender student rights in Tuesday testimony.


More than 30 states are expected to turn in their ESSA plans in time for the U.S. Department of Education's deadline of midnight on Monday.


As a new school year opens, DeVos talks with Education Week about civil rights protections for students, the Every Student Succeeds Act, special education, the bureaucracy, and more.


Democrats are pushing the education secretary to only approves plans that meet the Every Student Succeeds Act's requirements, but DeVos seems more inclined to give states a lot of leeway.


Despite recent setbacks, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos is not giving up on a school choice initiative, she said in a wide-ranging Education Week interview last week.


Education Week spoke with U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos on her tour "Rethinking School," which took her to Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, and, finally, Indiana.


The news from the U.S. Census Bureau wasn't all good, however: According to 2016 numbers, children under 18 made up 23 percent of the population, but 33 percent of those living in poverty.


The House of Representatives voted to cut about 3.5 percent from the U.S. Department of Education's budget on Thursday, although the Senate's funding bill would cut less and take a different approach in several respects.


Among other provisions, the Child Care for Working Families Act would ensure that families making less than 150 percent of a state's median income would not pay more than 7 percent of their income on child care.


House lawmakers voted to boost funding for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program by $100 million during debate over the House education funding bill for the next fiscal year.


Congress and President Donald Trump may soon strike a deal to solidify protections for those brought into the country illegally as young children, but things remain very much up in the air.


King has some big worries about how his successor, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, is handling civil rights enforcement.


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos wants teachers and school leaders to move past the blackboards-and-desks model of K-12 schooling, with an eye towards better serving individual kids.


Some states that turned in their Every Student Succeeds Act plans last spring didn't make many changes after getting feedback from the U.S. Department of Education.


The U.S. Secretary of Education is kicking off her trip in Wyoming, and swinging by Colorado, Indiana, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska.


Members of the Congressional Black Caucus want to strike language that bars school districts from using federal funds to cover the transportation costs of desegregation.


Republican and Democratic education secretaries from past administrations call on Congress to protect those who came to the U.S. illegally as children from potential deportation.


Senators poured more cold water on U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos' vision of a big new investment in school choice, and rejected proposed K-12 cuts.


Arizona is the 14th state to get the U.S. Department of Education's seal of approval on its plan to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act.


Lawmakers in the Senate overseeing education spending dealt a big blow to the Trump administration's K-12 budget asks in a spending bill approved Wednesday.


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos joined President Donald Trump and other cabinet officials in a visit to hurricane-ravaged Texas and Louisiana over the weekend.


School choice programs the Trump administration wants in next year's budget haven't gotten traction, at least with House lawmakers. But those aren't the only choice plans Congress has before it.


With the plan's approval, North Dakota's educators will experience some of the nation's most dramatic changes under the Every Student Succeeds Act this fall.


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