November 2017 Archives

"We are being outpaced and outperformed by countries like China, Germany, Vietnam, and the U.K." DeVos said in a speech to Jeb Bush's education foundation. "We are a nation still at risk. We are a nation at greater risk."


Several amendments to expand school choice in various ways have yet to gain traction as part of the Senate's bid to overhaul the tax code.


If lawmakers don't take some kind of action by Dec. 8, major parts of the government—including the U.S. Department of Education—will grind to a halt.


From teacher tax deductions to school choice, the two bills don't treat K-12 issues exactly the same. Here are a few key differences between them.


DeVos' approval of her home state's plan for the Every Student Succeeds Act was a long time coming.


If confirmed by the Senate, Schneider will serve as the director for six years, potentially beyond Trump's tenure as president.


This isn't the first time Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos has taken heat from Democrats for how she's handled the Every Student Succeeds Act.


So far, six states have ditched teacher evaluations that rely on student test scores. But even more may decide to change their performance reviews after the 2018 election.


A provision of the House and Senate tax bills involving tax-free bonds could make it harder for school districts to pay off long-term debt.


In this edition of "Answering Your ESSA Questions" we take a look at how states plan to distribute Title IV dollars under the Every Student Succeeds Act. The money can be used for a wide range of health, safety, arts, and college-readiness activities.


The Education Department appears to think that Michigan's application is now thorough enough to review. That could be a signal that Betsy DeVos is likely to approve her home state's ESSA plan.


More than 1,000 people and organizations had thoughts for Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos and her team on the department will decide who gets competitive grant money.


In recent weeks, Erik Prince, Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos' younger brother, has publicly discussed running for the Wyoming U.S. Senate seat.


Civil rights groups and their advocates in Congress worry the meeting could serve as a prelude to U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos ultimately revoking the guidance.


Tax cuts proposed by both the House and Senate would be financed by deficit spending that some advocates say could lead to pressure to cut K-12 funding. But not everyone agrees.


President Donald Trump has tapped Johnny Collett, who currently works at the Council of Chief State School Officers, to be the assistant secretary of education for special education and rehabilitative services.


Jason Botel told state superintendents "we trust you," but added the Education Department wants to make sure any state action "fits within the confines of the law."


Senate education committee Democrats used the confirmation hearing of two top U.S. Department of Education nominees to make their case against the Trump administration's favorite K-12 policy: School choice.


The changes would allow teachers to deduct $500 from their taxable income for purchases they make out of pocket for their classrooms, from pencils to software


Lawmakers will get the chance to question Mick Zais, the nominee for deputy secretary of education, and Jim Blew, the pick for head of planning, evaluation, and policy analysis.


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos told a roomful of CEOs that many students aren't mastering the skills needed for future careers.


How do ESSA plans stack up against each other? The Thomas B. Fordham Institute is out with its take.


The U.S. secretary of Education said at the top of the first meeting of the White House Task Force on Apprenticeship Expansion that a four-year degree isn't right for every student.


Republican Roy Moore has previously weighed in on a controversy involving segregationist language in the Alabama Constitution, while his Democratic opponent Doug Jones says education is the key for 21st century success.


Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, and Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., introduced the amendments to the Senate tax bill that could create federal incentives for increasing private school choice.


The Every Student Succeeds Act kept in place the testing regimen from the law it replaced, the No Child Left Behind Act. But states must bring in other factors, too.


A national teachers' union says the House bill would jeopardize nearly $250 billion in education funding over the next decade, but the Senate bill could put even more pressure on revenue for schools.


Tim Kelly, the pick for assistant secretary for career and technical education, authored a personal blog that, among other things, made pointed statements about Muslims, Head Start parents, and federal efforts to recruit women into the sciences.


Florida's ESSA plan would give state tests only in English, and it would also leave English-language proficiency out of the state accountability system. Civil rights activists have a problem with those approaches.


DeVos will visit a school in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on Wednesday, and then a school on St. Thomas later in the day.


As a candidate, now-President Donald Trump pledged a huge new school choice initiative, a slimmed down Education Department, the end of the common core, and more.


Congressional debate over the Republican-backed proposal to change the tax code is under way in Congress, and education issues are getting a share of the spotlight.


Nearly 10 months into a Trump administration and a Republican-dominated Congress, the potential changes to policies impacting teachers are starting to become clear and more numerous.


Recent data shows that most Americans are not aware of the savings plans that could be used to expand private school choice in the proposed Republican rewrite of the tax code.


Special education advocates are not fans of New York's plan to The Empire State, to give students with significant cognitive disabilities a test that matches their instructional level, not their age.


It's not clear if the offers are part of U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos' plan to trim the federal footprint on K-12, since these types of buyouts aren't unique to the Trump administration.


The bill would let families use up to $10,000 from 529 college savings plans for K-12 expenses, including private school tuition, but would scrap state and local income and sales tax deductions.


Sen. Bill Cassidy, a Louisiana Republican and education committee member who prioritizes issues for children with dyslexia, is impressed with Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos' approach to the issue.


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