January 2018 Archives

There was less attention on education in this year's speech than any similar joint address to Congress dating back to 1989, a review by the Education Week library found.

President Donald Trump used his first State of the Union address to call on Congress to create a path of citizenship for "Dreamers" and to provide big new funding for infrastructure, but he made almost no mention of K-12 schools.

Congress is still wrestling with a basic question: How to use educational data to improve schools, without further jeopardizing student privacy?

School choice, immigration, career and technical education, and early-childhood are among the topics ripe for a mention as President Donald Trump speaks to a joint session of Congress.

The island and its school system were already struggling with dire financial problems before Hurricane Maria struck. Last summer, Puerto Rico's education department closed 179 schools

The deal, outlined by White House officials with members of Congress, could shield from deportation those currently covered by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

The Trump administration's budget is likely to combine three significant research programs--the State Longitudinal Data System program, the Regional Educational Laboratory Program, and the Comprehensive Centers--advocates with knowledge of the proposal said.

Democrats used the hearing on Frank Brogan, nominee for assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education, to lambaste Education Secretary Betsy DeVos' implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos urged those at a meeting of the U.S. Conference of Mayors to help forge connections among K-12, postsecondary education, and the business community.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the Trump administration's efforts to round up drug traffickers would make communities safer, but didn't outline strategies tailored for schools.

Rep. Luke Messer, R-Ind., has introduced legislation to allow money in 529 savings plans to be used for home-schooling expenses, a proposal that was stripped out of a late version of the recent tax-code overhaul.

Kent Talbert, who served in the U.S. Department of Education under President George W. Bush, has been tapped as a senior policy adviser to Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

The Trump administration is said to be seriously considering incorporating the Education Department's office of innovation and improvement into its broader office of elementary and secondary education.

Funding for the U.S. Department of Education could go up in a final fiscal 2018 budget deal, but education funding advocates are worried that K-12 and other domestic programs could lose out to defense spending.

A stop-gap funding bill passed by Congress includes long-term money for the popular Childrens Health Insurance Program, but advocates wonder why it took so long.

Although the government was on track to reopen on Monday after a brief shutdown, issues underlying behind it, specifically the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, haven't been resolved by the deal, which lasts until Feb. 8.

A short-term federal government shutdown means a much quieter U.S. Department of Education headquarters than usual, but not much immediate effect on most school districts.

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos has the thumbs-up to ESSA plans from Georgia, Hawaii, Indiana, Kansas, Montana, and New Hampshire.

It is unclear if all states have implemented ESSA's requirement to provide transportation as needed for students in foster care, a report from the Chronicle of Social Change found.

Jim Blew, Kenneth L. Marcus, and Mick Zais got the OK from the Senate education committee for positions under Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

DeVos and lawmakers didn't offer specifics about how they might get new choice legislation over the finish line in an election year that's expected to be tough for Republicans.

Senators tell President Donald Trump that improving school facilities is "essential for advancing student achievement" and should be a part of any broader infrastructure spending plan.

Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos' memo on plans in case of a government shutdown notes that the department's approach is similar to contingency plans made in 1996, 2011, 2013, and 2016.

DeVos approved plans for Arkansas, Maryland, Missouri, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, South Dakota, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

The past decade of federal K-12 education redesign efforts "have not worked out as hoped," U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos said in a speech Tuesday at the American Enterprise Institute.

When it comes to legislative victories and policy accomplishments, President Donald Trump doesn't seem to have gotten as much accomplished on K-12 as his recent predecessors.

When it comes to evidence-based interventions, ESSA plans are a mixed bag, concludes Results for America's Evidence in Education Lab.

The Federal Communications Commission's recent decision to overturn net neutrality has school districts worried about the kind of access they could provide to online educational services.

Minnesota and West Virginia are the first two states that submitted plans in the fall to win federal approval.

States can spend their left-over School Improvement Grant money under rules outlined in the Every Student Succeeds Act, the department says.

Jones and Smith will replace Al Franken, the former Democratic senator from Minnesota who resigned last month after allegations of sexual misconduct, and Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I.

Some state and local governments are looking at ways to reduce the impact of the tax overhaul President Donald Trump signed into law last month that could have a negative impact on school funding for districts.

On some issues, like career and technical education, Congress has made progress over the past year. On other issues like student-data privacy, not so much.

Al Franken left the Senate at the start of 2018, and that means there are only 10 Democrats on the Senate education committee. We look at a few potential replacements for him.

States worry that offering their districts a choice of tests as allowed under the Every Student Succeeds Act could make it harder to compare student outcomes.

Similar to the other thirty-two states that gotten feedback so far this winter, Idaho has a long list of things to work on.

Trump has appointed James Lynn Woodworth to the top post at the National Center for Education Statistics.

In the latest installment of "Answering Your ESSA Questions," we look at whether districts and schools can apply for federal funds to audit their testing systems and give an update on the law's Innovative Assessment Pilot.

A member of the Senate education committee, Hatch also authored the Education Innovation and Research program, which is included in the Every Student Succeeds Act.

Eight senators said in a letter that such proceedings would help provide "a detailed understanding of the health and education challenges facing Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands."

States have until April 2 to submit their applications for the Every Student Succeeds Act's Innovative Assessment Pilot.

The threat of federal budget cuts, the prospects for school choice, the fate of the "Dreamers," and the Every Student Succeeds Act will be big things to watch.

Follow This Blog


Most Viewed on Education Week



Recent Comments

  • YARGI YAYINLARI: I¡¦m now not sure where you are getting your info, read more
  • stop smoking: you have an incredible blog here! would you wish to read more
  • web hosting: Campaign K-12: 'Only Bill Richardson Has a Bold Plan for read more
  • kpss: What is Taking place i am new to this, I read more
  • domy RzeszĂłw: Iˇ¦ve recently started a website, the information you offer on read more