May 2018 Archives

The Santa Fe Independent School District near Houston will receive a $1 million federal grant to cope with the aftermath of a mass shooting that left ten educators and students dead earlier this month.


There was little said at a Maryland school visit about controversial topics the school safety commission is likely to tackle, including whether teachers should be armed.


The Federal Commission on School Safety will have its first "field" hearing—and second meeting—at a school that has embraced Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports. Advocates are already questioning whether Education Secretary Betsy DeVos will come away with something new to share with the K-12 field.


Dozens of civil rights organizations are asking U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos to clarify her recent contention that schools can decide whether or not to report undocumented students to immigration authorities.


This guidance, from the U.S. Department of Education, makes it crystal clear: "A state has discretion as to whether it will offer ... this flexibility."


Human Rights Campaign wanted U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos to pay close attention to the results of a survey it did showing lesbian, bisexual, gay, and transgender students often feel unsafe in school.


The department has created a new, $3 million grant program aimed at helping states provide apprenticeships in STEM fields (that's science, technology, engineering, and math) during high school.


More than a dozen Democratic senators allege in a letter that changes to civil rights investigations under Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos jeopardize students who face discrimination at school.


The U.S. secretary of education told the House education committee Tuesday that it's up to schools whether to report undocumented immigrant students to federal authorities. Advocates immediately pounced on her remark.


House Democrats and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos sparred over civil rights and ESSA, but largely avoided controversial questions about school safety in the aftermath of the Texas high school shooting last week.


Democrats want to invest at least $100 billion over the next 10 years in K-12 schools, including to help bolster teachers' salaries and repair school infrastructure, Democratic congressional leaders said Tuesday.


Now that there has been another deadly school shooting, at Santa Fe High School in Texas, educators, parents, and others are wondering just what the commission, led by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, has been up to since its inception.


Duncan's comments came in the wake of a school shooting Friday in Sante Fe, Texas, which left 10 dead, mostly students.


The U.S. secretary of education will speak to lawmakers on the House education committee on Tuesday about the department's "policies and priorities."


Eight organizations—representing state chiefs, parents, local superintendents, and principals as well as school social workers, counselors, and psychologists—want U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos to give their members a voice when it comes to the work of the president's school safety commission.


Congressional Democrats held a forum on various civil rights issues in education on the 64th anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court case that prohibited laws establishing segregated schools.


The briefing, which was not open to the public, was intended to help lay the groundwork for work of the administration's school safety commission. The panel is charged with finding solutions for mass shootings in schools.


The Trump administration wants to push school choice for military families. But it doesn't support a proposal to use some Impact Aid funding to help expand school choice to military-connected children, an administration official told Education Week.


School officials urged federal lawmakers to update the law governing the handling and disclosure of student data in a House hearing, saying that it must provide more clarity to education leaders.


Two nonprofits that work with states suggest in a new report that they develop procedures to build evidence and establish outside partnerships, among other strategies to vet school improvement ideas.


Senators confirmed Mick Zais, the former state schools chief for South Carolina and a retired Army brigadier general, by a 50-48 vote on Wednesday.


That brings the number of states with approved plans to 44, plus the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Still awaiting the OK: California, Florida, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Utah


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos railed against state constitutional prohibitions on public funds going to religious institutions in a speech to the Alfred E. Smith Foundation in New York City.


With two Indiana lawmakers slated to leave the House at the end of this Congress, there will be something of a vacuum for champions of school choice in the House of Representatives.


President Donald Trump has tapped Scott Stump, who runs "a learning solutions" company in Lincoln, Neb., as assistant secretary for career, technical, and adult education at the U.S. Department of Education.


The revamp would be aimed at grouping together employees with similar skills, as opposed to having offices focused on particular programs, said Elizabeth Hill, a department spokeswoman.


The Jobs and Justice Act, introduced by the caucus Thursday as an omnibus bill, also supports the creation of environmental justice programs at the U.S. Department of Education.


Advocates push to expand federally backed school choice under the Trump administration has pretty much fallen flat this Congress—and there might be only one proposal left that can save it.


In a letter to Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló, more than 30 members of Congress say closing these schools in the wake of Hurricanes Irma and Maria would hurt 66,000 students and teachers and have a "disastrous impact" on student learning.


Mike Braun will be the Republican nominee against Sen. Joe Donnelly, a Democrat, in the November Senate election. He won the GOP nomination by beating Reps. Luke Messer and Todd Rokita of Indiana.


As part of a proposal to reduce the federal government's bottom line, The Trump administration is asking Congress to cut $7 billion from a program that helps provide low-income children access health-care.


The announcement of the first lady's "Be Best" initiative included almost no details, including whether the Trump administration is seeking more money for any of the causes she Trump mentioned.


Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos has now approved ESSA plans from 42 states, plus the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Big states like California and Florida, however, are still awaiting approval.


At least ten states have plans to create some kind of accountability "dashboard", which consider school performance on a host of factors, but don't give an overall score to a school.


Support for school choice dipped somewhat after President Donald Trump's first year in office, but remains robust in general, according to survey results from an advocacy group formerly led by Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos has greenlighted two more Every Student Succeeds Act plans from Virginia and South Carolina. That brings the grand total of states with approved plans to 39, plus the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.


There are major shifts in the number of school districts reporting to the federal government that they have court desegregation orders or voluntary plans to desegregate. Experts and the Education Department couldn't explain the changes.


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