July 2018 Archives

More STEM teachers, more teachers for rural schools, and more district partnerships with higher education. Those are key ingredients in the Virginia senator's plan to address educator shortages.


Legislation from one of President Donald Trump's most vocal critics in Congress is taking aim at how Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos is handling civil rights issues.


Louisiana is the first state to get the all clear from the U.S. Department of Education to participate in the Every Student Succeeds Act's "Innovative Assessment" pilot.


Advocates for integration decried a recent move by the Trump administration to roll back racial diversity guidance, but praised efforts in Congress to promote the issue.


Educators fear of overstepping federal student privacy laws can make it tougher for law enforcement and schools to share information that could prevent a potential school shooting, experts said at the commission's latest hearing.


DeVos used a speech Wednesday to what was billed by organizers as the biggest gathering of conservative high school-aged activists in recent history to make the case for her signature policy: school choice.


Momentum behind reauthorization of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act has grown in recent weeks, after a lobbying effort by the Trump administration on Capitol Hill.


Trauma-informed care and state support for mental health paid off big in Wisconsin, state and local officials told U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos and other members of the Federal School Safety Commission at a field hearing.


The Democrats announced that their legislation would be a "sweeping reauthorization" of the nation's Higher Education Act. So what's in the bill?


Last reauthorized in 2006, the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act is a $1.1 billion program that provides grants to states.


ESSA, like its predecessor, the No Child Left Behind Act, requires states to test students in grades 3 through 8 and once in high school, in math and reading. But who foots the bill?


The "National Council of the American Worker" created by President Donald Trump's executive order will be made up of senior administration officials and will develop strategy to train and retrain employees for high-demand industries.


The Urban Institute projects a decline of more than 25 percent in the proportion of overall federal funding that will go to education and other benefits for children over the next decade, the Urban Institute says.


Jim Blew, the former director of Student Success California, an education advocacy group, has officially been confirmed by the U.S. Senate to lead the office of planning, evaluation, and policy analysis at the U.S. Department of Education. Blew has been serving at the department in an advisory capacity.


The Trump administration may soon get its wish when it comes to one of its major education policy priorities: a Senate-approved overhaul of federal career and technical education law.


ESSA got rid of the requirement in the law it replaced, the No Child Left Behind Act, that teachers must be highly qualified, which typically meant they needed to have a bachelor's degree in the subject they are teaching and state certification.


The proposed tax credit would be targeted towards teachers who work in high-poverty schools, and it could mean up to a $190 raise per week for teachers


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos green-lighted California and Utah's plans to implement the Every Student Succeed Act. That means just one state is still waiting: Florida.


The House appropriations committee voted Wednesday to advance a bill providing a slight funding increase for the U.S. Department of Education, bringing overall funding to about $71 billion.


Students, especially vulnerable populations and children in remote areas, aren't getting nearly enough access to mental health services, experts told the Federal School Safety Commission.


A judge's ruling in Puerto Rico limits the scope of who can operate new schools similar to charters, in a decision that would limit the ability of operators from the U.S. mainland to open the independent schools on the island.


The administration rescinded guidance that emphasized permissible ways for schools and colleges to take race into account to promote student diversity.


Oklahoma is the forty-seventh state to get the federal seal of approval for its plan to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act. That leaves just three states waiting: California, Florida, and Utah.


Puerto Rico is the first district to take advantage of the Every Student Succeeds Act's weighted student-funding pilot.


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos says merging the U.S. Department of Education and the Department of Labor will help the country's schools catch up to our counterparts in other countries, including some she visited on her recent swing through Europe.


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