August 2018 Archives

DeVos said Friday that she has "no intention" of taking any action or position when it comes to whether schools can use federal funds under the Every Student Succeeds Act to purchase firearms for teachers or teachers.


Schools that want to arm teachers will be allowed to use federal funding under the Every Student Succeeds Act to do so, Frank Brogan, the assistant secretary of elementary and secondary education, told the Associated Press.


Democrats think 2018 is their year, and they're using education—and educators—to make their case.


In Alabama, educators, experts, and community members urged the Federal School Safety Commission not to arm teachers.


Democrats told Betsy DeVos that a grant under the Every Student Succeeds Act was passed by Congress to help pay for education technology and efforts to improve school climate, not guns.


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos squeaked into office by the skin of her teeth about 18 months ago. And now, at least one Republican senator who supported her is taking heat for her vote on the campaign trail.


As a two-time presidential candidate and veteran lawmaker on Capitol Hill, John McCain put school choice at the center of his plans to help disadvantaged students.


DeVos has been weighing whether to rescind the guidance, which has proven to be one of the most controversial initiatives from Obama's education policy team.


President Donald Trump and Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos have taken similar, but not identical, positions on arming teachers.


Total education spending would increase by more than $500 million over fiscal 2019 in the bill approved by the Senate, which would fund the U.S. Department of Education at up to $71.6 billion.


The money for firearms purchases would come from the Student Support and Academic Enrichment grants, which receive $1.1 billion under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


Two senators are using the NBA superstar's new school as an inspiration for new legislation, formally called the Full-Service Community Schools in Distressed Communities Act.


The past 18 months have been tough in many respects for Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos. But is the public increasingly taking her side on school choice, her favorite issue?


As Democrats seek to catch a "blue wave" and take control of the House of Representatives in November, education isn't getting much play in campaign ads.


School improvement, students in foster care, and lack of flexibility might be some of the difficult pieces of the Every Student Succeeds Act for school district leaders to deal with.


The teachers' union in Puerto Rico argued that the new school choice programs supported by Puerto Rico's education department violate the U.S. territory's Constitution.


It doesn't look like new flexibility offered by the Every Student Succeeds Act is turning out to be the bonanza for school choice that some supporters were hoping.


Educators, students, and community members at a federal school safety commission meeting in Wyoming, which lets districts arm certain school staff, were deeply divided on the idea of arming staff.


Senate Democrats rebuked a move by the Trump administration to withdraw Obama-era guidance designed to encourage diversity in K-12 and higher education.


Academic achievement at Ohio schools eligible for School Improvement Grants during the Obama administration increased for a few years, a new study says, but SIG's legacy remains complicated.


President Barack Obama's longest-serving education secretary, admits in a new book that he made some communications mistakes; but when it comes to his signature policies, he wishes he'd doubled down.


Arming some school staff provides a needed safety option for rural districts far from law enforcement, educators told the Federal School Safety Commission during an Arkansas site visit Wednesday.


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