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Where Presidential Candidates Stand on Education: Your New Guide to 2020

EdWeek2020.jpg

Check out Education Week's interactive feature "Education in the 2020 Presidential Race" to see where the 2020 presidential hopefuls stand on a range of education issues.

Education has played an unpredictable but sometimes dynamic role in the 2020 presidential campaign. We've seen impassioned exchanges about school segregation create a big early moment for two leading Democrats. Charter schools have proven a relatively complex and sometimes tricky issue for candidates, although whether a recent turn in the spotlight for charters helped the public's understanding is up for debate. And of course, President Donald Trump, his education record, and U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos are subjects for debate.

It can be hard to keep track of it all and keep what you know in one place. But we're here to help. 

We just published "Education in the 2020 Presidential Race." It's our new interactive tool that we hope will help you get and stay informed about what candidates have said and done on key education issues. You can learn what candidates stand on topics such as education civil rights, school safety, and how much public funding schools receive. Here's what you'll see when you visit the section on school desegregation, for example:

EdWeek2020Desegregation.PNG

Want to learn about one candidate in particular? Just click on the "candidates" tab at the top of the tracker and then on that person's photo to learn more about their positions.

Want to compare multiple candidates on just one issue? Select on the "topics" tab and click on charter schools, testing, or whatever issue you want to see where how candidates stack up. 

Although we still have a large field of candidates among Republicans as well as Democrats, several would-be nominees have already dropped out of the race. We did not include these former candidates in the tracker. 

Not all of the candidates have made their views clear on all the topics we selected. If you would like to provide us information about candidates you think is missing from the tracker, please let us know and send a relevant link. 

So, one more time: Click here to visit our 2020 education tracker

Photo: From left, Democratic presidential candidates Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., entrepreneur Andrew Yang, former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke and former Housing Secretary Julian Castro are introduced Thursday before a Democratic presidential primary debate hosted by ABC at Texas Southern University in Houston. (David J. Phillip/AP)


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