The tussle at the federal level comes during a tense time in education labor-management relations across the country.

The president's school safety commission will consist of four federal officials, but will meet with experts around the country, DeVos said.

"President Trump is committed to reducing the federal footprint in education, and that is reflected in this budget," Secretary of Education DeVos told members of a key House subcommittee.

Tangible school safety upgrades have gotten a lot of attention. But estimates show physical security improvements may not be cheap, or within the reach of cash-strapped districts.

On Tuesday morning, DeVos will pitch the Trump administration's fiscal 2019 budget plan for the Department of Education to the House appropriations subcommittee that oversees federal money for K-12.

Indianapolis, Puerto Rico, and three other school districts have applied to join the Every Student Succeeds Act's weighted student-funding pilot during the 2018-19 school year.

Maryland private school leaders at Barron Trump's school and others want President Donald Trump and Congress to bolster mental health and background checks, not arm teachers.

The bill passed the House exactly one month after 17 students and staff were shot and killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.

Republicans tended to focus on what law enforcement and schools could have done to prevent the shooting in Florida last month, while Democrats pushed for more-restrictive gun laws.

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., slams the education secretary's approach as head of the commission, while DeVos' spokewoman says Murray gives an "inaccurate account" of a meeting between the two.

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