We sat down with the superintendent of Maryland's second-largest school district to get his views on the president's proposed budget for education.


In defending the president's budget on Capitol Hill, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos implored lawmakers to focus on "students and their education," rather than "schools and systems." Democrats weren't buying it.


President Donald Trump's 2018 federal spending plan would cut close to 4 percent from formula-based Title I aid, while earmarking new money for public school choice.


Many responses to the fiscal 2018 budget proposal focused on plans to cut 13 percent of the Education Department's budget, eliminate or reduce programs, and increase funding for school choice.


The president's 2018 fiscal plan would cut spending for teacher development, after-school enrichment, and career and technical education, but faces an uncertain future in Congress.


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos excoriated foes of school choice in a speech to an advocacy group, but didn't give details about the Trump administration's proposals to expand it.


We already know the basics of how President Donald Trump wants to handle spending at the U.S. Department of Education, but there are several outstanding questions ahead of the official budget release Tuesday.


President Donald Trump swept into office in January with grand visions of dramatically expanding school choice. That was, of course, before a swarm of very negative headlines concerning Trump, Russia, and the FBI.


If peer reviewers want to recommend against approving a state's ESSA plan, the lack of permanent political staffers could become an issue, some experts say.


The GAO looked at a sample of 75 federal grants. And almost all of them—69—were incomplete in some way in terms of oversight, according to the report.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments