Michael Wooten, will head up the Office of Career, Technical and Adult Education, at least for now. Leonard Haynes, is likely to be a postsecondary education point person.


It's one of the most controversial questions about the Every Student Succeeds Act and accountability in general: How should schools be graded?


In a speech, the education secretary said she's working to slash federal regulations that, in her view, are tying school leaders' hands.


President Donald Trump is calling on the U.S. Department of Education to put a new focus on STEM education, even as his budget seeks to scrap one of the only federal pots of money that schools can use for education technology.


States' timelines under the Every Student Succeeds Act range from five to 15 years, and goals vary from modest annual improvements to 100 percent proficiency targets.


Attendance, particularly chronic absenteeism, and college-and-career readiness are by far the most popular new areas of focus for accountability in the ESSA plans from 40-plus states.


The former teacher, principal, and school superintendent became one of the most influential members of Congress on education policy during his 13 terms in the House.


Massachusetts is the 15th state so far to have its Every Student Succeeds Act plan approved by the U.S. Department of Education.


For teachers, parents, principals, and others, the Every Student Succeeds Act is no longer on the horizon. Now it's in their schools. Here's an EdWeek guide to all things ESSA.


Amid the Trump administration's push to slash federal red tape, educators, advocates, and parents tell the U.S. secretary of education they're worried about the effect that could have on historically overlooked groups of students.


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