The answer may well be yes, if you consider a report by the National Council of Teacher Quality, an advocacy organization that likes the idea of more rigorous evaluations.


Even though both the House and Senate ESEA bills keep annual tests, they go very different ways on a lot of other assessment issues.


States will continue crafting and implementing accountability systems that build on nine basic principles outlined by state education leaders way back in 2011, chiefs say.


Teachers, school administrators, principals and state officials have launched a digital ad campaign asking lawmakers to finish work to reauthorize the ESEA.


The administration is planning to create a $20 million pilot program that would allow high schoolers to use Pell grants to pay for college courses.


It's hard to imagine that Washington State—which is back under NCLB and not loving it—isn't feeling a little sore these days.


Any educational resources created with federal grants would have to be openly licensed under a proposed regulation.


Some of the biggest achievement gaps are found in schools that are performing well otherwise, a CAP analysis finds.


The only education issue that merited a question from the CNBC moderators was about student loan debt, but online learning and career and technical learning also got brief mentions.


In theory at least, the deal could create more time for GOP Rep. Paul Ryan, the presumptive next House speaker, to focus on other legislation, including ESEA reauthorization.


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