Webb was a Democratic senator from 2007 to 2013, and worked on English-language learner and testing issues while in the U.S. Senate.


Just five states—Colorado, Minnesota, New York, Rhode Island, and Texas—opted to come up with their own turnaround models and submit them to the U.S. Department of Education for approval.


The House Rules Committee is to meet July 7 to again consider its version of the federal K-12 law's rewrite; a vote could come as early as the next day.


The big question is whether the plans submitted to the Education Department will actually make a difference when it comes to the equitable distribution of teachers.


Next week, the U.S. Senate is slated to start debating a rewrite of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. One of the big points of contention to watch? Expanding school choice.


Christie made his presidential announcement at the Livingston, N.J. high school, which he attended and where he said he developed many of his traits that served him well later in public office.


Under one vision, states and the federal government would set goals for student achievement, but the states would be able to use any strategies they wanted to get there.


The 2016 election season is just getting started, but there's already a favorite sport among GOP contenders: Hitting Jeb Bush for his support of the Common Core standards.


So the big news of the day wasn't education related, but the U.S. Department of Education is celebrating all the same, at least on social media.


Get beyond the Beltway for a moment. Which curriculum directors, superintendents, parent engagement administrators, and others have the best ideas?


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