Republicans who don't think the House No Child Left Behind Act rewrite goes far enough in restoring education decisions to the states could gum up the works in floor debate.


Scratch beneath the surface of a White House analysis and it seems highly unlikely that the funding impact would be nearly as dire as the administration warns.


The bulk of the 125 amendments came from Democrats who are seeking to restore accountability and dedicated funding streams for certain education programs.


Making public schools work better is a "personal mission" for many governors, said Gov. Brian Sandoval, a Nevada Republican, at a National Governors Association meeting.


Duncan is worried about the impact of funding provisions, and a lack of investment in teacher quality, pre-kindergarten programs, and initiatives like Investing in Innovation.


The U.S. Secretary of Education is criticizing Republicans for not imposing limits on testing in the same breath he's calling for keeping annual, statewide assessments.


A new schedule would send the Republican-backed No Child Left Behind rewrite to the floor for debate Wednesday and Thursday, with a final vote scheduled for Friday morning.


Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., who is almost definitely running for president, is trying to make a big issue of his potential opponents' support of the Common Core State Standards.


A majority of the potential Iowa GOP electorate would find a presidential candidate's common-core support acceptable, but it's pretty much a dead heat in two other states.


U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, one of Obama's staunchest opponents on immigration, said the ruling is a "major turning point in the fight to stop Obama's lawless amnesty."


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