Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., who is almost definitely running for president, is trying to make a big issue of his potential opponents' support of the Common Core State Standards.


A majority of the potential Iowa GOP electorate would find a presidential candidate's common-core support acceptable, but it's pretty much a dead heat in two other states.


U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, one of Obama's staunchest opponents on immigration, said the ruling is a "major turning point in the fight to stop Obama's lawless amnesty."


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has been warning against a GOP NCLB rewrite bill that's slated to pass the House next week.


The NEA and AFT have launched separate grass-roots lobbying efforts in hopes of continuing to push their priorities for the federal K-12 overhaul.


Republicans in both chambers plan to push Title I portability further during floor debate by offering amendments that would allow Title I money to also be used for private schools.


The report criticizes the bill's appropriation levels, which would lock in current funding levels through fiscal 2021, capping spending for the next six years at $800 million lower than it was in fiscal 2012.


The national, four-year graduation rate has ticked up for the second year in a row, growing from 80 percent in the 2011-12 school year, to 81 percent in the 2012-13 school year.


A Republican bill to overhaul the No Child Left Behind Act, which would significantly curtail the federal footprint in K-12, will be considered by the full House the week of Feb. 24.


The Title I aid formula is highly complicated, but in a nutshell, the money is distributed to districts based on their size and concentration of poverty, among other factors.


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