The real star of the day, however, was Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, the Republican presidential hopeful who is spending the early part of this week in the nation's capital.


The U.S. Secretary of Education wants to preserve Investing in Innovation, an Obama administration competitive-grant program that would be scrapped under Republican legislation to overhaul the No Child Left Behind Act.


Congress mulls a rewrite of the No Child Left Behind Act that could roll back the law's testing requirements—or let districts create their own systems, with state approval.


Please Stop Punitive High Stakes Testing! That was the message that poured into the inboxes of congressional staffers taking the lead on rewriting the No Child Left Behind Act this morning ... more than 800 times.


Sens. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Patty Murray, D-Wash., plan to work over the next few weeks to produce a bipartisan bill.


During the panel, Democrats worried that a bill from Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., to rewrite the No Child Left Behind Act would hurt the most-disadvantaged students.


States can cook up their own turnaround interventions for low-performing schools using federal SIG dollars and submit them to the U.S. Secretary of Education for approval.


The U.S. Secretary of Education is unhappy about what he sees as a lack of resources and accountability in GOP legislation to rewrite the No Child Left Behind Act.


The California Department of Education is seeking a one-year reprieve from the U.S. Department of Education from the use of student performance on Smarter Balanced assessments in determining school performance.


The House education committee will mark up a proposal to overhaul the No Child Left Behind Act on Feb. 11, and the House will debate the measure the week of Feb. 24.


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