Under the plan, states would work with the federal government to gradually give teachers a pay raise, with a special emphasis on high-needs schools, the Harris campaign says.


Presidential hopeful Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., made her first policy pitch on the campaign trail Saturday: A new federal program to boost teacher pay.


A stump speech, the Massachusetts senator and presidential candidate offered a preview of how 2020 Democratic campaign hopefuls might address K-12 education by mentioning school spending and teachers unions.


House Democrats, who took control of their chamber at the start of this year, will be eager to grill Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos about the president's proposal to cut her budget, and more.


The union, which went for Hillary Clinton early in the 2016 presidential campaign cycle to the chagrin of many members, has outlined an endorsement process that will feature "deep engagement and honest conversation before any decision can be made."


More than half the leading candidates for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination don't bother to include anything about education in the "issues" section of their websites


During a televised town hall, U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., said an incentive to volunteer for teenagers would create a "pipeline" of public service and make higher education more accessible.


The former congressman from Texas who ran unsuccessfully for the Senate also opposes vouchers and says educators should be allowed "to teach to the child and not to the test."


"Students need to be considered on their merit. And this plays into the narrative about things just not being fair for everyone," DeVos said in an interview on Fox News.


Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and her team argue that the provision that bars religious organizations from serving as contractors to provide services for eligible low-income students runs counter to a Supreme Court decision.


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