What if you got a chance to tell Obama and Duncan where you think the nation is going wrong, and right, when it comes to K-12 policy?


Congress has just 16 working days before its month-long summer recess. Here's a rundown of what's on its education-related to-do list.


States will be required to submit new plans to address teacher distribution by April of 2015, or just a few months before the department likely will begin to consider states' requests to renew their waivers from the NCLB law.


Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, South Dakota, Nevada, and Virginia are told they can keep their flexibility through the end of the upcoming school year.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is calling on state chiefs to support school counselors, though advocates chafe at administration attempts to consolidate the main federal program that finances K-12 counselors.


On the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act, some of the original Freedom Riders joined students for a ceremony at the U.S. Department of Education.


Some states with NCLB waivers will be able to extend that flexibility for a year, even as they negotiate revisions to their teacher-evaluation systems with the Education Department.


Randy Dorn, Washington's state chief, doesn't think schools that miss achievement targets should have to notify parents.


An Education Week analysis of recent federal monitoring reports finds that many states were hard-pressed to turn around the bottom 5 percent of schools and help schools with persistent achievement gaps.


Teachers' unions are wary of a new grant in Sen. Tom Harkin's Higher Education Act reauthorization draft that would rank teacher-preparation programs based in part on student test scores.


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