Murray, who is known as an effective dealmaker, has a great incentive to compromise with Republicans: Her home state of Washington is the only ex-waiver state in the country.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is clearly not backing off from the K-12 policies that his administration has pushed for the past six years.


Blueprints for reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act law have been flooding in from various stakeholders as lawmakers in both chambers begin work on a bill.


The education secretary won't back away from policies the Obama administration has embraced from the get-go, a senior administration official has signaled.


A look back at prior attempts to renew the federal law makes one thing clear: We're drifting further and further away from the idea of a strong federal role in K-12 accountability.


As states try new ways to keep college costs down, some have voiced criticism of the free-tuition-for-all approach for helping families who may not need assistance.


The Council of Chief State School Officers urges Congress to pass a bipartisan revision of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act that would keep the NCLB testing schedule intact.


If Congress were to enact the proposal, approximately 9 million students would be eligible for the federal-state partnership program.


As Congress gears up to reauthorize the No Child Left Behind Act, the administration may well lose a lot of the ground it's gained on teacher evaluation, school turnarounds, and assessments.


One of the most significant policy debates at the heart of the forthcoming reauthorization will be how or if to change the law's testing requirements.


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