The Senate bill to reauthorize the federal law for career and technical education would give states more power over setting goals. The Trump administration backs the legislation.


The Trump administration has proposed significant cuts to the U.S. Department of Education's budget. But the Senate wants record funding for the agency.


The U.S. Senate voted Monday to approve the nomination of Frank Brogan as assistant secretary of elementary and secondary education.


The House passed a career and technical education bill last summer, and the Trump administration is pushing for the Senate to do the same.


So do educators and their advocates think this is a good idea or a bad idea? Do they think it would it actually impact what goes on in districts and classrooms? Or would it just be a bureaucratic reshuffle inside the Beltway to them?


Discussions about how to reauthorize the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act, which is the single largest source of federal funds for American high schools, have ramped up recently in Congress.


How would the plan actually work? What do educators have to say about it? What's the Trump administration's rationale for this? And will it actually happen?


President Donald Trump outlined the details of a plan to combine the two into a single agency focused on workforce readiness and career development. The plan is likely to face serious political and logistical hurdles.


Sources say there has been high-level Trump administration talk about the agencies merging altogether, or taking over some of each other's duties.


On Wednesday, 50 senators voted down a push by the Trump administration to revoke about $7 billion in money set aside for the Children's Health Insurance Program.


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