Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, said they would vote against DeVos over concerns about her track record with and knowledge of public schools.


A 2015 Senate vote on a federal school choice bill provides a clue about which senators might not be big DeVos fans.


The short answer: Maybe not quite as much as you might think. For one thing, the Every Student Succeeds Act doesn't give her much running room.


Democrats tried a variety of tactics to attack DeVos' nomination, questioning her fitness for the job, her political background, and her ability to avoid conflicts of interest.


The Senate education committee is meeting Tuesday to vote on President Donald Trump's nominee for education secretary, Betsy DeVos, a billionaire school choice advocate, best known for her work chairing the American Federation for Children.


As a Senate committee nears a vote on Betsy DeVos's nomination as U.S. secretary of education, several Democrats on the panel continue to press concerns about the nominee's financial disclosure and ethics agreement.


The Jan. 30 letter from the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights was released one day before the Senate education committee's scheduled vote on DeVos' nomination.


The issue of the regulatory burden coming from the federal government has come up recently in connection with higher education and with a spending requirement in the Every Student Succeeds Act.


Teachers, former education secretaries, and others with links to education are speaking out about President Donald Trump's executive order about refugees and international travel.


Moderate senators appear likely to support DeVos, meaning she will almost certainly be confirmed. But Democrats are already fundraising off of the controversy surrounding her nomination.


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