The Education Department isn't willing to cut Washington, the first ex-waiver state, any slack, a warning to other states that may be on the verge of losing their flexibility.


Sixty big-city school systems pledge to focus on strategies proven to improve outcomes for African-American and Latino boys.


The Old Line State and the Gem State became the seventh, and eighth states to see their waivers extended, for one additional year


There was a ton of state activity this week, with implications for federal policy, most of it centered around ... you guessed it ... Common Core. For more, check out there good reads:


It's 1981, and Education Week obtains a top-secret memo by President Ronald Reagan's education secretary saying the U.S. Department of Education should be abolished and its functions reassigned to other federal agencies.


Several Race to the Top states are tweaking their implementation of new teacher-evaluation policies adopted as part of the promises made in their applications.


As we move deeper into midterm election season, here's a preview of some potentially competitive House and Senate races with ramifications for education.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan joins others at a Washington event commemorating the landmark 1964 law, but saying more work still needs to be done.


The two national teachers' unions played some serious politics during their recent annual conferences, including calling for the resignation of U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan.


The U.S. Secretary of Education also said that Pennsylvania's current level of commitment to funding public schools in Philadelphia is "unacceptable."


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