In order to craft an overhaul of the federal K-12 education law that can clear the committee, the full Senate, and the president's desk, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., will have to sharpen his politicking skills.


The two national teachers' unions, which collectively represent more than 4.6 million educators, are some of the most important (and powerful) groups that will try to shape the draft going forward.


More tidbits on Elementary and Secondary Education Act reauthorization: The draft proposal could change the approach to using research in approving education plans.


The Kentucky senator and likely presidential candidate just happened to be in the first primary state Wednesday to attack the Common Core State Standards, an issue championed by his likely opponent, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush.


The American Federation of Teachers and the Center on American Progress say annual tests should be retained for reporting purposes, but scaled back for school-accountability purposes.


Adding extra time to the day or year is a lot easier said than done, according to a report released Tuesday by the Center on Education Policy


The top Democrat on the Senate education committee said annual tests are "one of the most important tools we have," and would be "very concerned" about any proposal to roll them back.


Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., chairman of the Senate education committee, kicked off the reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind Act by saying he wants to start a dialogue about testing.


The forthcoming budget proposal will include $2.7 billion in increased federal K-12 spending, including $1 billion for Title I grants that fund districts with large numbers of low-income students.


Murray, who is known as an effective dealmaker, has a great incentive to compromise with Republicans: Her home state of Washington is the only ex-waiver state in the country.


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