U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., handily beat out tea party challenger, state Rep. Joe Carr, in Thursday's primary.


August is a great time to take a deep dive into Head Start, extended learning time, and peer-reviewed assessments.


As the electronic cigarette trend reaches an increasing number of youths, Senate Democrats want the FDA to take additional steps to regulate the industry's marketing tactics.


Congress left town for its August recess last week without filling a number of key positions at the U.S. Department of Education. That means some folks are stuck with "acting" at the start of their title, and other positions are just plain vacant.


The stance by U.S. Sen. David Vitter puts him at odds with current Gov. Bobby Jindal, a fellow Republican battling to repeal the Common Core State Standards in Louisiana.


A look at how the American Federation of Teachers and the National Education Association are donating to House and Senate campaigns.


The Thomas B. Fordham's Institute's longstanding president, Chester E. "Checker" Finn Jr., steps down Aug. 1.


Georgia, Delaware, Minnesota, New York, and South Carolina are the latest to receive extensions of their flexibility from the U.S. Department of Education.


The person best positioned to make an educated guess on that question is Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., the top Republican on the Senate education committee. Alexander is the likeliest candidate to take over the helm of the Senate education committee if the chamber flips to GOP control in the fall.


U.S. Senators Edward Markey, D-Mass., and Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, introduced a bill Wednesday that would tighten restrictions on the use of student data.


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