The big partisan education legislation logjam seems to be breaking, at least a little bit, for more targeted bills


Arizona, Kansas, Oregon, each had until Thursday to submit a proposal to the U.S. Department of Education addressing the agency's concerns with their waivers.


In its request for an extension, CORE is asking the Education Department to give districts an extra year to reach full implementation of the new teacher-evaluation system. That would mean 2016-17, rather than 2015-16.


Indiana, which recently became the first state to ditch the Common Core Standards, has landed itself in hot waiver water with the U.S. Department of Education.


Robert Gordon was credited by some with working to ensure that the unprecedented education aid included in the 2009 stimulus would be accompanied by a new commitment to education redesign.


A White House report released today recommends modernizing the privacy regulatory framework that governs how student data is handled.


No Child Left Behind waivers are not having a very good week on Capitol Hill.


Michele McNeil is leaving Education Week for a new opportunity at the College Board, but Politics K-12 will live on and thrive.


It's worth noting that funding for special education has been a key issue in Rep. John Kline's suburban Minnesota district, where voters narrowly backed President Barack Obama in 2012.


Release of the new guidance coincides with the announcement of task force findings related to sexual assault on college and university campuses.


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