The president's new thinking on tests seems to put his Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan, in a pretty awkward position.


Civil rights and advocacy groups want the U.S. Department of Education to hold states renewing their No Child Left Behind Act waivers accountable for low-income students, minorities, English-language learners, and students with disabilities.


New Hampshire wants to cut the frequency of state-wide summative tests in a handful of districts, in favor of performance-based tests.


Delayed teacher preparation regulations from the U.S. Department of Education are supposed to hold federal teacher-preparation programs more accountable.


The notion that teachers' unions only give to Democrats and education advocacy organizations only give to Republicans is wrong.


The Sooner State stands a very good chance of getting its waiver back. It's just a question of when.


Here's Part II of a run-down of the U.S. Senate races that will decide which party controls the chamber during the 114th Congress.


Scott sent a letter to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, requesting a hearing on the issue before the Office of the Administrative Law Judges.


Now that Oklahoma's institutions of higher education have given its standards the OK, the Sooner State has suddenly found itself in a position to regain NCLB flexibility.


State tests would be less frequent and assessments would incorporate a lot of performance tasks, in an imaginary 51st state.


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