At long last, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has granted his home state of Illinois a waiver from the mandates of the No Child Left Behind Act.


After dropping out of Smarter Balanced, Kansas had to submit a special double-testing waiver to use common-core aligned field tests for students in special education.


Here's an edited transcript of a 30-minute Q-and-A with the U.S. Secretary of Education, who touched on the important decisions he's facing in his remaining time in office.


U.S. Rep. Dave Loebsack, an Iowan who is a major champion of rural schools, has been tapped to serve as the top Democrat on the House subcommittee that deals with K-12 policy.


In an interview, the U.S. Secretary of Education said he wants to support implementation of common standards and overhaul teacher-prep rules. Rewriting NCLB wasn't tops on his list.


In addition to leading the rocky Affordable Care Act rollout, Kathleen Sebelius presided over a big change in how the Health and Human Services Department awards aid for the preschool program.


Can the Senate education committee produce a bipartisan bill to expand pre-kindergarten? Probably not, but it sounds like Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, the chairman of the panel wants to give it a shot.


The California district and its teachers' union announced today they are withdrawing from a first-of-its-kind No Child Left Behind waiver the U.S. Department of Education granted less than a year ago.


An official announcement could come later this month—and, if the waiver is pulled, as expected, the move would make the Evergreen State the first to lose its flexibility.


At a congressional hearing, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan answered questions about the common core and competitive grants, while testifying about his $68.6 billion budget request for the U.S. Department of Education.


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