The Sooner State stands a very good chance of getting its waiver back. It's just a question of when.


Here's Part II of a run-down of the U.S. Senate races that will decide which party controls the chamber during the 114th Congress.


Scott sent a letter to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, requesting a hearing on the issue before the Office of the Administrative Law Judges.


Now that Oklahoma's institutions of higher education have given its standards the OK, the Sooner State has suddenly found itself in a position to regain NCLB flexibility.


State tests would be less frequent and assessments would incorporate a lot of performance tasks, in an imaginary 51st state.


State school chiefs and urban district leaders committed to eliminating redundant tests, but they also made clear that they will not back away from annual standardized testing.


Back in August, Oklahoma became the second state to lose its waiver from the No Child Left Behind Act, and accountability in that state has been unsettled ever since.


The National Education Association's political action committee spent $8.3 million since July, including $900,000 to the Democratic Governors Association.


No matter which party comes out ahead on Election Day, the Senate's Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee will have a new leader.


The top Democrat on the House Education Committee, an architect of the No Child Left Behind Act, will share his thoughts Nov. 12 on where federal education policy has been and where it needs to go next.


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