A left-leaning Washington think tank issued a report last Friday, "Vouchers Are Not a Viable Solution for Vast Swaths of America," that examined the impact of a nationwide voucher program.


In just over two months, Congress must decide if it basically wants to punt on creating a regular fiscal 2017 budget, a decision could have consequences for K-12 spending.


Many students at St. Andrew Catholic School near Orlando take advantage of the state's tax-credit scholarship program, a form of school choice, which President Donald Trump strongly supports.


The resolution sponsored by Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., would repeal the regulations from late last year that govern how teacher-prep programs measure the success of their students.


A small group of former Obama political appointees who promoted Race to the Top, Investing in Innovation, and many of the former president's other greatest (or worst) edu-hits have put together a website, Education44.


Any federal measure to create Washington-backed education tax credits probably wouldn't go through the House and Senate education committees. That leaves open a couple of possibilities.


The Senate resolution and a similar House move aim to end now-paused regulations governing state ESSA plans and issues ranging from testing opt-outs to school turnarounds.


President Donald Trump championed school choice without delving into specifics during his first address to a joint session of Congress.


Those sentiments at a White House meeting with college presidents ignited a firestorm on social media, with numerous folks saying on Twitter that HBCUs were set up in response to segregation.


The top two Democrats on education in Congress want the education secretary to flesh out her announced plan to audit programs at the department and cut unnecessary ones.


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