The department made it clear that this new competition will be "distinct" from past efforts, and the new money is a wide-open slate.


Kansas, Oklahoma, and South Dakota are the latest to get their grades from the U.S. Department of Education on their No Child Left Behind waiver implementation.


The U.S. Department of Education is allowing Idaho to give only common-core-aligned field tests to students this spring, which means no achievement data will be produced for parents, educators, and the public.


Sen. Murray is trying her best to make the state's case to Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, but it seems to be far from a slam dunk.


Both states asked for too much leeway in implementing their teacher-evaluation systems, so federal officials want to take a closer look.


The nation's largest teachers' union said that states and districts in too many places have "botched" the implementation of the common-core standards.


The U.S. Department of Education grants North Carolina a waiver allowing a one-year delay in tying teacher evaluations to personnel decisions, and it gives seven states waivers so they don't have to double-test students.


The first season of the Netflix political potboiler was rich with education-policy plotlines, and we're hoping for more of the same.


Overall, the new data showed that roughly two-thirds of School Improvement Grant schools improved in reading or math, and another third declined.


The Obama administration's recent school discipline guidance is laudable, but decisions about how to deal with student behavior are best left to local officials, wrote four House Republicans


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