After New York is dinged for not putting a list of reward schools online versus sending out a press release, some are wondering if federal officials are monitoring the right things.


There may not be enough new money at lawmakers' disposal to fund both programs at a level that makes the White House happy.


San Antonio, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Southeastern Kentucky, and the Choctaw Nation in Oklahoma are all part of a great big Obama administration interagency collaboration known as the "Promise Zone" initiative.


Rep. Eric Cantor, R-Va., the House Majority Leader, used a high-profile speech on K-12 to draw attention to what he sees as a concerted effort to tamp down school choice.


A new report by an independent evaluator, calls into question whether SIG schools are really getting assistance that's very different from schools that aren't part of the School Improvement Grant program.


The law hits its dozen year mark during the school year in which it specifies, that technically, all children are supposed to be proficient in reading and math.


How much, if any, money will Congress provide for the administration's biggest new initiative, a plan to help states expand preschool to more four-year-olds?


A new report from the U.S. Department of Education's inspector general chronicles implementation woes in Race to the Top states.


Mississippi and Idaho have some of the biggest problems, according to a new wave of No Child Left Behind Act monitoring reports from the U.S. Department of Education.


The U.S. Secretary of Education, who is said to have voiced an opinion on New York City's top schools job, has gotten involved in local decisions many times before.


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