The applicants in the $280 million federal grant competition will be eligible for four-year grants ranging from $37.5 million to $75 million.


University researchers found that poor students fared better in D and F schools than they did in A and B schools, which has implications for No Child Left Behind waivers.


The co-chair of the influential Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation says its strategy on teacher quality won't change, even with a new administration.


The U.S. Secretary of Education tells returning employees, "I know that you're coming back to even more work than you already had on your plate before the Department had to shut down."


The legislation would allow teachers participating in alternative-certification programs to be considered "highly qualified" for an additional two years, through the 2015-16 school year.


A pending deal in Congress would give lawmakers time to find a broader budget solution before another round of sequestration cuts hits agencies in January.


When federal Education Department employees return to work, their lengthy to-do list will include monitoring waivers, judging Race to the Top applications, and pursuing financial sanctions against Georgia.


A Republican proposal would give agencies flexibility to determine how they made sequester cuts. But this is not going over well with education advocates.


The end of the shutdown can't come soon enough for school lunch. It's unclear at this point which states have the cash they'll need to keep feeding students into November.


We're more than a year away from the 2014 mid-term elections, but the National Education Association is already calling out four Republicans, who could have pivotal races next fall, for what the union sees as their role in the current near complete-and-total fiscal meltdown


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