"We'll be examining and auditing and reviewing all of the programs," DeVos told the host of a Michigan radio program in a Tuesday interview.


A group of public, private, and home-school parents and educators met with President Donald Trump and Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos in a White House listening session.


These ESSA rules that are now on thin ice set the timeline for how schools are rated, measuring "consistently underperforming" groups of students, and other key issues.


In her first print and radio interviews since taking office, the new secretary of education opened to conservative opinion journalists about her rocky confirmation process.


Last year, Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., oversaw a federal spending bill for education in the House that cut the department's overall budget of $68 billion by $1.3 billion.


The Obama administration's accountability regulations for the Every Student Succeeds Act have been paused by the Trump administration, and they're are on thin ice in Congress. But U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos wants states to keep going on their ESSA plans.


The new secretary of education's visit to the school was previously publicized by the Washington Teachers Union president, who urged protesters to meet her. And her visit to Howard University earlier this week generated angst as well.


Betsy DeVos as education secretary could energize her opponents to open their wallets and pound the pavement for Democratic candidates, including in states with key Senate elections in 2018.


The new U.S. Secretary of Education sought to address questions about her qualifications, saying that she's open to learning from the department's staff and from educators in the field.


New U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, who was sworn in after one of the most heated confirmation processes in history, will address Education Department employees Wednesday, at 2 p.m.


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