The end of the shutdown can't come soon enough for school lunch. It's unclear at this point which states have the cash they'll need to keep feeding students into November.


We're more than a year away from the 2014 mid-term elections, but the National Education Association is already calling out four Republicans, who could have pivotal races next fall, for what the union sees as their role in the current near complete-and-total fiscal meltdown


Remember sequestration, those 5 percent across-the-board cuts to federal programs that went into effect last March? These days, with the debt-ceiling the debate and the shutdown sucking up all of the oxygen in Washington, it seems some in Congress may have pushed them to the backburner.


So far, school districts seem to have been spared the vast majority of the pain, but that doesn't mean folks in the education field don't have questions about the shutdown.


Since leaving the Obama administration, Clinton has turned back to a longheld interest of hers: early-childhood education.


The number of applicants for this year's contest is down, but so is the money up for grabs.


The federal budget impasse was expected to affect up to 19,000 children who are served by the 23 Head Start grantees that receive their federal funding on Oct. 1.


Over the next few days, we'll be compiling a list of Frequently Asked Questions about the government shutdown and answering them on the blog.


With no end in sight to the shutdown, House Republicans are introducing a series of bills funding certain programs that have gotten political attention, including Head Start.


Can't get enough of congressional dysfunction? Are you one of the nearly 4,000 furloughed Education Department employees and have some time on your hands?


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