Federal and state accountability must do more than just hold schools' feet to the fire on student outcomes, civil rights groups say in a letter to President Barack Obama.


Tennessee recently delayed the use of its new common-core aligned state tests, and Gov. Bill Haslam announced that the state will begin a public vetting of the standards.


A new grant competition from the U.S. Department of Education will help states get early education programs off the ground and give others the chance to expand already successful models.


The president's new thinking on tests seems to put his Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan, in a pretty awkward position.


Civil rights and advocacy groups want the U.S. Department of Education to hold states renewing their No Child Left Behind Act waivers accountable for low-income students, minorities, English-language learners, and students with disabilities.


New Hampshire wants to cut the frequency of state-wide summative tests in a handful of districts, in favor of performance-based tests.


Delayed teacher preparation regulations from the U.S. Department of Education are supposed to hold federal teacher-preparation programs more accountable.


The notion that teachers' unions only give to Democrats and education advocacy organizations only give to Republicans is wrong.


The Sooner State stands a very good chance of getting its waiver back. It's just a question of when.


Here's Part II of a run-down of the U.S. Senate races that will decide which party controls the chamber during the 114th Congress.


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