Maryland and North Carolina, both Race to the Top states, are among those that want to delay part of their teacher-evaluation implementation under their No Child Left Behind Act waivers.


The data left out a lot of things that could prove pivotal when trying to make claims about the efficacy of the program.


The Obama administration has continued to think of creative ways to get what it wants without having to ask lawmakers for it, even congressional Democrats.


Two-thirds of schools that entered the federal School Improvement Grant program in its first year have seen gains in student achievement, but another third saw declines or no change.


AASA, the School Superintendents Association, pinpoints the states that lean most heavily on the federal government to fund K-12 education.


The 31 finalists represent 80 school districts across 21 states, including urban and rural districts. Winners, to be announced in December, will split $120 million.


Lawmakers questioned the wisdom of the Obama administration's proposal to create a new high school redesign program using U.S. Department of Labor funds.


Up to 40 grants, ranging from $2 million to $7 million, would be awarded to high schools that better prepare students for college and careers.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan's comments on common core have set off a firestorm of controversy. But it's a point he's made before.


The U.S. Department of Education is refusing to disclose the top-scoring but unfunded Investing in Innovation scale-up application, which scored 77.83, because the score was not "approximately 80."


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