The national, four-year graduation rate has ticked up for the second year in a row, growing from 80 percent in the 2011-12 school year, to 81 percent in the 2012-13 school year.


A Republican bill to overhaul the No Child Left Behind Act, which would significantly curtail the federal footprint in K-12, will be considered by the full House the week of Feb. 24.


The Title I aid formula is highly complicated, but in a nutshell, the money is distributed to districts based on their size and concentration of poverty, among other factors.


The Democrats' substitute bill would create a new title for early-childhood education that would provide funds through a formula to states willing to match the amount.


Bush, the former Florida governor who is mulling a White House run, advocated for choice, assessment, and a low-profile for federal policymakers in K-12.


The chairman and ranking member on the Senate education committee aren't on the same page when it comes to a timeline for rewriting the No Child Left Behind law.


On the right, lawmakers will offer amendments to further reduce the footprint of the federal government, and on the left, members will try to wholesale replace the federal K-12 measure with one of their own.


Evergreen State policymakers are making a fresh push to regain the state's flexibility under the No Child Left Behind Act, even as Congress mulls an NCLB overhaul.


The real star of the day, however, was Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, the Republican presidential hopeful who is spending the early part of this week in the nation's capital.


The U.S. Secretary of Education wants to preserve Investing in Innovation, an Obama administration competitive-grant program that would be scrapped under Republican legislation to overhaul the No Child Left Behind Act.


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